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Local News

  • Eminence named District of Distinction

    In 2012, Eminence Independent Schools faced declining enrollment, had unmet progress goals from the state and only 39 percent of its seniors were graduating as college or career ready.
    Fast-forward to 2014 and Eminence became the first district in the state to reach 100 percent on that same benchmark. The district also went from not meeting Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) to being in the top 5 percent in the state and enrollment has grown by 40 percent in the past three years.

  • Beyond the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, Robison looks for new ways to help

    Ariel Robison nominated herself for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge last year, but now she’s thinking about more ways to help others who face losing loved ones to the deadly disease.
    In January 2014, Robison lost her mother, Alicia, to ALS, short for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive, fatal neuromuscular disease that slowly robs the body of its ability to walk, speak, swallow and breathe.
    Like so many others, Robison took up the ice bucket challenge to raise awareness about the disease.

  • Energy Stars

    Members of the New Castle Elementary Energy Team feel empowered in teaching their fellow students about electricity generation, efficiency, conservation and safety.
    One year after a group of New Castle fourth-graders won an all-expense-paid tour of Washington, D.C., as a part of the National Elementary Rookie of the Year Award, energy team members planned and held an energy fair in the school’s gym March 27.

  • Volunteers make help center award possible
  • Fiscal court magistrate makes history

    In becoming a Henry County magistrate, Rickey Timberlake only wanted to help the people. He didn’t set a goal of breaking new ground by becoming the first African American to serve on fiscal court.
    As he sees it, this office simply provides him with another avenue to give back to the community.

  • Fire destroys Robinson Farm Equipment in Eminence

    Wind gusts propelled flames, dense black smoke and intense heat through Robinson’s Farm Equipment in Eminence and threatened several nearby homes on South Main during the March 31 blaze.
    Fanned by the winds and fueled by the contents at Robinson’s, the blaze consumed the structure in about an hour after the 12:20 p.m. alarm went out to Henry County fire and emergency personnel.
    Two people inside the store during lunchtime noticed the smoke and fled.

  • Bad weather extends the school year

    After a wild winter with record snowfall, both school districts in the county have modified their school calendars to get in all their required instructional time.
    According to regulation, schools must accrue 1,062 hours of instructional time.  Both districts had already scheduled more than the required number of hours into their calendar and have some flexibility in scheduling their make-up days.

  • Jailer bill can't break out of House committee

    Legislators worried about some county jailers slacking off on the job ran out of time to win approval for a Senate bill meant to increase accountability for the constitutional office during the 2015 General Assembly session, but it will be reintroduced in 2016.
    The schedule called for legislators to wrap up their work in Frankfort March 23-24.
    Senate Bill 184, drafted by state Sen. Danny Carroll, R-Paducah, gained the support of the full Senate and had a first reading before the House’s Committee on Local Government before the session’s end.

  • Watershed Moment

    Students learn best when they get to wade into their lesson and get their feet wet, such as when the eighth grade science class at Henry County Middle School goes outside the classroom for their hands-on water quality studies.

  • Campbellsburg school to get upgrades

    When Campbellsburg Elementary students come back to school in the fall, they’ll walk into a brighter, better place to learn.
    “Improving the learning environment has been proven by study after study to be a very important factor in increasing student achievement.  It also improves morale of students, teachers and parents,” said Tim Abrams, superintendent of Henry County Public Schools. “Henry County is a wonderful community with awesome kids; they deserve nothing less than a top notch education in a top notch facility.”