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Local News

  • Lawson commuted to Louisville, but refused to leave Eminence

    Segregation impacted where Joe Louis Lawson, 78, could go to school, but not his place of employment in Louisville, where he rose to be a supervisor and remained for 43 years before retiring.
    Named for the World Heavyweight Champion who dominated boxing for 12 years beginning in the 1930s, Lawson was born in Eminence when blacks still were not welcomed in white schools.

  • Hope Health receives smoking cessation grant

    Hope Health Clinic recently announced that it has received a $10,000 CVS Health Community Grant.
    The Community Grants Program was created by CVS Health, as part of its commitment to help people achieve their best health by providing financial assistance to programs that are focused on smoking cessation and prevention.
    The support from CVS Health will help Hope Health Clinic offer smoking cessation classes over a period of two years.  Patients will be connected with a wellness coach to help assure continued success with smoking cessation.

  • Scrap metal truck wreck snarls 55

    A 2007 International tractor-trailer shut down Highway 55 when it strewed a load of scrap metal along a curve just north of Eminence Friday.
    Kentucky State Police Trooper Patrick Stucker responded to the accident at 11:22 a.m. and found the International truck from Crenshaw and Sons Inc., Louisville, still upright, but its trailer overturned in the ditch, according to Trooper Mitchell Hazelett, KSP Post 5 spokesman.

  • Prior to publishing, book began as family teaching aid

    The Pearson household in Pendleton has several good readers and one writer.
    For Amy Pearson, 30, a mother who home schools and serves as a substitute teacher in Trimble County, the impulse to help her oldest child learn to read caused her to put pen to paper.
    At that point, she had no thoughts of publishing her own work.

  • Cattlemen donate to Help Center

    Joe Durbin, left, with the Henry County Help Center, received a check for $1,000 from Irvin Kupper, president of the Shelby County Cattlemen’s Association, at the group’s January meeting.

  • Help Center launches Fifth Thursday give aways

    The Henry County Help Center will give away bread and produce on the fifth Thursday of the month, beginning Jan. 29 from noon to 1:30 p.m., according to Director Joe Durbin.
    The give away is open to all Henry County residents on a first-come, first-served basis.
    Participants will need to bring identification that shows they live in Henry County.
    Participants need to bring their own boxes and bags to fill, Durbin said.
    No volunteers will be available to help with carrying the items to vehicles.

  • Ham day

    Saturday morning brought 4-H’ers and community members to the Henry County Extension Office for its annual Ham Day. What began as a 4-H project of curing a country ham has grown into a community event now that Henry County’s Extension Office has a ham house to hang the hams for curing.

  • Hornback shares update on 2015 legislative session

    While there’s a push for the Kentucky Legislature to take up a smoking ban, state Sen. Paul Hornback indicated he’s wary of the unknown effects of so-far unregulated electronic cigarettes.
    About 17 constituents and local officials met with Hornback at the Henry County Courthouse Annex Monday as he shared his perspective and sought public input on the 30-day legislative session. He spoke about his concerns about e-cigarettes when an attendee asked if the state senator would introduce any legislation of his own.

  • Clubb to serve as first HCPS chairwoman

    A seemingly insignificant agenda item led to a history-making moment at the Henry County Public Schools’ monthly Board of Education meeting Thursday.
    Board member Miranda Clubb was chosen to serve as the chair of the board; the first woman ever to assume this leadership position.

  • Fiscal court considers fairgrounds crackdown

    With the prohibition against alcohol usage at the 4-H building at the Henry County Fairgrounds not working, a fiscal court committee will look at ways to possibly strengthen the ban.
    The problem usually arises when community members lease the building on a Friday or Saturday night for parties, county officials discussed at the Jan. 20 fiscal court meeting.
    This despite the rental contract having a clause saying there’s to be no alcohol on the premises, Judge-Executive John Logan Brent noted.