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Local News

  • Cover Girl

    Being hired by Cabela’s, the outdoor recreation retail chain, has turned into a model opportunity for its Louisville location’s firearms counter lead outfitter from Pleasureville.
    The image of CanDance Moran aiming a long gun into the deep blue sky has appeared in tens of thousands of mailboxes on the cover of Cabela’s spring shooting- and National Rifle Association-themed catalog.

  • Downtown fire’s latest casualty

    With a nudge from the excavator arm Feb. 9, the one-story Eminence Cleaners building on Main Street became the latest casualty of the destructive blaze from July. This is the third building to come down, though the cleaners was spared from the fire, it became collateral damage due to the wall it shared with the neighboring building that burned and later was torn down. In terms of the structures, the July fire has claimed approximately $118,000 worth of property, based on the buildings’ assessed values.

  • Getting Ready for Valentine’s Day

    The Henry County Public Library’s youngest patrons loved the activities held Feb. 5 as Valentine’s Day approached. During story time, the children listened to a story called “Owl Babies” about children who love their mother. From left, siblings Ellianna, Keylee, Brayden, James and Teague Sturgeon, all of Port Royal, enjoyed the story. Eden Detwiler and grandmother Tommie got to play with the library’s owl puppet. Joelle Detwiler concentrates on her coloring.

  • Answers needed for KIPDA study on aging services

    A Port Royal woman has been tasked with getting as many responses from Henry County for a community needs assessment for the aging as possible to help direct future services through KIPDA.
    Debi Geisler, who is a University of Louisville, Kent School of Social Work student currently doing her college practicum at the Family Resource Center in New Castle, wants to receive approximately 380 responses from people age 50 and above for the study, in order to best plan for future services for the elderly.

  • Crimes in New Castle raise a concern

    Dale Mahoney is worried.
    “I’m just concerned for myself and my neighbors,” Mahoney said at the February meeting of the New Castle City Commission. “I’m concerned about the recent break-ins and the massive drug activity that goes on right here in our city.”
    Mahoney attended the city meeting to see what could be done about the recent rash of crimes in the town. His concerns were shared by Mayor Denny Benham and several commissioners.

  • History lesson

    Though wooden siding and roof on the former one-room black schoolhouse on First Street in Campbellsburg weathered heavily over the years, the building’s foundation is still strong, notes historian Karen Shannon.
    Discontinued as a school since segregation ended, the former educational facility will provide lessons again with a focus on history.
    Having recently acquired the structure for $5,000, new owners Karen and Bill Shannon plan to proceed with a sympathetic renovation on the historic school.

  • Simpson honored for Apollo 11 mapmaking

    For his role in assisting with the Apollo 11 moon shot, Charles Allen Simpson will be remembered in Eminence for “looking toward heaven long before he went there,” as Mayor Drane Stephens expressed it at Monday’s city council meeting.
    More than 45 years after Apollo 11 made history as the first manned spaceflight to the moon, the role an Eminence man played in the inaugural moon landing came to light.

  • Auto auction to locate in Eminence

    Insurance Auto Auctions plays an outsized role in recovering the useable materials from 3.5 million vehicles totaled each year in the United States, facilitating the sale of 1.7 million of them at 170 locations across the country.
    Jeanene O’Brien, IAA’s vice president of global marketing, recently said in a phone interview the company would open its latest Kentucky location in Eminence, setting up shop at the 30 acres that was formerly home to the Brunswick plant.

  • News briefs for Feb. 4

    Learn the art of dry stone wall building
    Master stone mason Richard Tufnell will present The Art of Building  Dry Stone Walls at the Oldham County History Center on Thursday, February 12 at 6: 30 p.m. Held in the Rob Morris Educational Building, this program will include a cash bar and light dinner fare.
    Tufnell has been recreating dry laid stone walls for over 30 years.  He has been commissioned to oversee the building of several dry stone wall projects in Oldham County, including one at Woodland Farms and currently at Ashbourne Farms.

  • Motorcycle raffle to benefit the Trooper Project

    The Kentucky State Police has partnered with Man O’ War Harley-Davidson® and the Calipari Foundation in an effort to raise money for two great causes.
     With the purchase of a $10 ticket, fans will be entered into a raffle to win the ultimate University of Kentucky basketball motorcycle signed by Coach John Calipari.