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Today's News

  • Fiscal court magistrate makes history

    In becoming a Henry County magistrate, Rickey Timberlake only wanted to help the people. He didn’t set a goal of breaking new ground by becoming the first African American to serve on fiscal court.
    As he sees it, this office simply provides him with another avenue to give back to the community.

  • Energy Stars

    Members of the New Castle Elementary Energy Team feel empowered in teaching their fellow students about electricity generation, efficiency, conservation and safety.
    One year after a group of New Castle fourth-graders won an all-expense-paid tour of Washington, D.C., as a part of the National Elementary Rookie of the Year Award, energy team members planned and held an energy fair in the school’s gym March 27.

  • A finger-lickin' good meal

    Volunteers from Second Wind Dreams served up a special meal of KFC fried chicken plus a visit from Col. Sanders look-a-like, Bob Thompson, from Lawrenceburg, for residents of both Providence and Twin Oaks in New Castle March 27. Second Wind Dreams strives to improve the quality of life of seniors by making some of their wishes come true. Every resident plus staff at the two residential living centers received a meal, which included 175 pieces of fried chicken, plus 50 chicken strips, as well as fried okra, mashed potatoes and a biscuit. 

  • Volunteers make help center award possible

    Intense community involvement led to the Henry County Help Center receiving Dare to Care Food Bank’s Agency of the Year Award out of 250 non-profits the regional food relief program works with.
    More than 20 volunteers accompanied help center Director Joe Durbin to the 2015 Partner Appreciation Dinner at the African-American Cultural Center in downtown Louisville March 24, knowing that the Henry County non-profit was among the four finalists for the award.

  • Beyond the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, Robison looks for new ways to help

    Ariel Robison nominated herself for the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge last year, but now she’s thinking about more ways to help others who face losing loved ones to the deadly disease.
    In January 2014, Robison lost her mother, Alicia, to ALS, short for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a progressive, fatal neuromuscular disease that slowly robs the body of its ability to walk, speak, swallow and breathe.
    Like so many others, Robison took up the ice bucket challenge to raise awareness about the disease.

  • Eminence named District of Distinction

    In 2012, Eminence Independent Schools faced declining enrollment, had unmet progress goals from the state and only 39 percent of its seniors were graduating as college or career ready.
    Fast-forward to 2014 and Eminence became the first district in the state to reach 100 percent on that same benchmark. The district also went from not meeting Annual Yearly Progress (AYP) to being in the top 5 percent in the state and enrollment has grown by 40 percent in the past three years.

  • Henry County math teacher to discuss Common Core on KET show

    On the next edition of Education Matters, panelists join host Bill Goodman to discuss the state’s adoption and adaptation of the national Common Core standards, which in Kentucky are known as the Kentucky Core Academic Standards (KCAS). Education Matters “Inside the Common Core” airs Monday, April 13 at 9/8 p.m. on KET.
    In Feb. 2010, Kentucky became the first state to adopt the national Common Core State Standards in mathematics and in English/language arts.

  • Politicians support JCTC campus project
  • Campbellsburg school to get upgrades

    When Campbellsburg Elementary students come back to school in the fall, they’ll walk into a brighter, better place to learn.
    “Improving the learning environment has been proven by study after study to be a very important factor in increasing student achievement.  It also improves morale of students, teachers and parents,” said Tim Abrams, superintendent of Henry County Public Schools. “Henry County is a wonderful community with awesome kids; they deserve nothing less than a top notch education in a top notch facility.”

  • Watershed Moment

    Students learn best when they get to wade into their lesson and get their feet wet, such as when the eighth grade science class at Henry County Middle School goes outside the classroom for their hands-on water quality studies.