Today's News

  • Taylor lights a candle for others

    Savannah Taylor is a survivor.

    The 9 year-old’s positive attitude survives not from the miracle results of her newest chemotherapy treatment, but her sincere concern for others over herself.

    Taylor was diagnosed four years ago with chronic myelogenous leukemia.  A form of cancer usually found in adults, not children.  White blood cells grow at an accelerated rate in the blood and she considered a stem cell disorder in bone marrow.

  • Smithfield man killed in Oldham wreck

    By Tracy Harris

    A crash in Ballardsville Sunday evening killed the driver of a pickup truck and closed Ky. 22 for several hours.

    Darren Ellis, of Smithfield, died after his truck overturned near Payton Lane on Ky. 22.

    According to Oldham County Police spokesperson Mike Head, Ellis was headed east around 7 p.m. when his Ford F-350 failed to negotiate a turn and left the roadway.

    Ellis, 32, was pronounced dead at the scene by Oldham County Coroner Brett Donner.

  • Shelby residents question outlet mall

    By Steve Doyle

    Landmark News Service

    Simpsonville City officials didn’t attend a community-wide briefing conducted last week by Horizon Group to present plans about its proposed outlet mall, so now a couple of concerned residents are taking their questions to the city.

  • Henry/Trimble Animal Shelter is open for business

    Project manager Tony Walker on Thursday received the certificate of occupancy for the new Henry and Trimble Animal Shelter, meaning the facility has passed all required inspections.

  • 1887: 43.5 acres purchased for $400

    200 Years Ago

    On July 27, 1812, two citizens were before the county court on the charge of breach of peace.  Both were found guilty and fined for their actions (no explanation given).  Peter Troutman was fined $4.17 and William O’Nan was fined $8.

    On July 24, 1812, Isaac Green posted a marriage bond for 50 pounds in order to secure a license to marry Nancy Roberts, daughter of James Roberts.  The bond was co-signed by James Roberts.  The wedding ceremony was performed on July 30, 1812, by the Rev. Isaac Malin.

    175 Years Ago

  • Fair once was a July 4 picnic

    In the early 1900s, the Henry County Fair then called the Henry County Homecoming and Fourth of July Picnic, boasted attendance records paling any event in the state aside from the Kentucky Derby.

    More than 100 years later, its original location and amusements have changed but it still draws families from across the county.

  • Drought could lead to livestock poisoning

    Drought and hot weather has increased the questions we are getting in the County Extension Office concerning cattle and cattle feeds.

    While this should be simply a reminder to experienced farmers, some of it may be beneficial, especially to newer farmers. These tips come from Dr. Roy Burris, Extension Beef Specialist at the UK Princeton Farm, who is, by the way, a very wise and experience cattleman himself.

    Beware of poisonous plants

  • Public Records for the week of July 4, 2012


    Melissa Raye Brownie, 29, Pendleton, to Andrew Ward Shearer, 38, Pendleton.

    Jennifer Nichole Turner,30,Eminence to Timothy Wade Benham, 47, Eminence.

    Jessica Marie Tarte, 23, Westport to Jeremiah Dane Goff, Wesport.

    Property Transfer

    Fannie Mae, AKA Federal National Mortgage Association, to Davis Wood Properties LLC. 121 N. 2nd street, Campbellsburg; $31,000.

  • Fifth annual Biggest Loser to begin July 15

    Be getting your teams together for the Biggest Loser Contest, which will be running from July 15 through Sept. 24.

    Teams should be at least three people and there is a $20 entry fee per person which will be payable at the initial weigh-in and $5 weight management fees for not showing up for a weigh in or for gaining weight.

    North Central District Health Department will be offering blood sugar and  blood pressure screenings at the initial and ending weigh-ins which will be held at the Henry Christian Church. 

  • Technology changes prompt font problems

    Sometimes I’m convinced that technology is more difficult that it’s worth.

    As reliant as we are on technology, particularly at the Local, to get the paper out each week, technology  slaps us in the face a little.

    Unfortunately, when technology quirks happen, it often shows in our finished product. And for that, we apologize to you, our readers.