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Today's News

  • Henry, Eminence to keep taxes flat

    As local governments have prepared for the upcoming 2015-2016 budget year by setting real estate tax rates, both the City of Eminence and the Henry County governments have decided not to change their real estate tax rates.
    Officials with the Henry County Fiscal Court, the city councils and commissions and the Henry and Eminence boards of education are required to set real estate tax rates under certain rules made by Kentucky law.

  • Wade raises hands in silent praise

    Jackie Wade’s ministry involves speaking in pictures as a way to include more deaf people in church services.
    A resident of Campbellsburg since marrying her husband, retired minister Sanford, a little more than two years ago, Wade teaches a basic sign language class at the Campbellsburg Community Center on Tuesday evenings with Joy Willoughby assisting.
    It was Wade’s first husband who opened her eyes to the difficulties the deaf face in life, how much their lack of hearing excludes them from activities and interactions with others.

  • Spanish students in for cultural experience

    While Aurora Benavente-Beamonte of Benicassim, Spain, teaches Spanish at Henry County High School, she’s also immersing herself in American culture to benefit her English students back home.
    Teaching at her fourth location in the United States, Benavente has seen a lot of the country and made a lot of friends.

  • A cool day in Campbellsburg

    The August weather for the rescheduled Campbellsburg Day last Saturday, after being rained out of its regular date in June, could not have been much more comfortable. The community celebration attracted many Henry County Fair queens, imaginary princesses, firefighters, a superhero, football players, businesses, politicians and a crowd of locals.

  • ‘Beauty and the Beast’ is Downstream’s latest production

    The Theatre Downstream and Henry County High School will present Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast.” Performances will be at the John W. Smith Auditorium at Henry County High School.
    “The cast is a mixture of both veteran theatre actors and students from the surrounding area,” according to a Theatre Downstream news release about the production. “With 426 shows and over 300 years of combined theatrical experience, this show promises to be an exceptional experience not to be missed.”

  • Henry County Fiscal Court bids farewell to departing magistrate

    The Henry County Fiscal Court bade departing magistrate Nick Hawkins a fond farewell as he resigned in August to take a leadership position with the Communication Workers of America union in Georgia.

  • SBA offers storm assistance in Henry County

    The U.S. Small Business Administration’s Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet issued the following statement after the announcement of the Presidential disaster declaration for several counties in Kentucky affected by severe storms, tornadoes, winds, flooding, landslides and mudslides on July 11 to 20.

  • Poker run is a big success

    When the Christmas in August Poker Run stopped at Scriber’s Station in Eminence Aug. 16, organizers were well on their way to raising $7,149, according to Tracey Reynolds of the Carroll County Youth Services Center. About 200 motorcycles participated in the event. The proceeds will go to purchase Christmas presents for families in need. Reynolds thanked all who made the poker run possible.

  • Changes being planned to 55 in Eminence

    While improving a dangerous curve on Hwy. 55 takes precedence in any widening project through Eminence, there are many more factors to take into account, Kentucky ransportation  and local officials discussed in an Aug. 12 planning meeting.
    Several city officials and Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent met with Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and engineering firm URS to hear feedback in the preliminary planning process.

  • Kick-started

    A large turnout of citizens and public officials at the launch of fundraising to repair the Odd Fellows lodge roof raised hopes that the organizers will meet their goal to restore the building that housed the fraternal organization since 1886.
    New Castle city officials, represented by Main Street Manager Jeff Thoke and Joe Yates, the chairman of the preservation committee, have been working with members of Washington Lodge No. 1513 to find a way to replace the roof that collapsed after a heavy March snowstorm.