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Today's News

  • A cool day in Campbellsburg

    The August weather for the rescheduled Campbellsburg Day last Saturday, after being rained out of its regular date in June, could not have been much more comfortable. The community celebration attracted many Henry County Fair queens, imaginary princesses, firefighters, a superhero, football players, businesses, politicians and a crowd of locals.

  • ‘Beauty and the Beast’ is Downstream’s latest production

    The Theatre Downstream and Henry County High School will present Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast.” Performances will be at the John W. Smith Auditorium at Henry County High School.
    “The cast is a mixture of both veteran theatre actors and students from the surrounding area,” according to a Theatre Downstream news release about the production. “With 426 shows and over 300 years of combined theatrical experience, this show promises to be an exceptional experience not to be missed.”

  • Henry County Fiscal Court bids farewell to departing magistrate

    The Henry County Fiscal Court bade departing magistrate Nick Hawkins a fond farewell as he resigned in August to take a leadership position with the Communication Workers of America union in Georgia.

  • SBA offers storm assistance in Henry County

    The U.S. Small Business Administration’s Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet issued the following statement after the announcement of the Presidential disaster declaration for several counties in Kentucky affected by severe storms, tornadoes, winds, flooding, landslides and mudslides on July 11 to 20.

  • Poker run is a big success

    When the Christmas in August Poker Run stopped at Scriber’s Station in Eminence Aug. 16, organizers were well on their way to raising $7,149, according to Tracey Reynolds of the Carroll County Youth Services Center. About 200 motorcycles participated in the event. The proceeds will go to purchase Christmas presents for families in need. Reynolds thanked all who made the poker run possible.

  • Changes being planned to 55 in Eminence

    While improving a dangerous curve on Hwy. 55 takes precedence in any widening project through Eminence, there are many more factors to take into account, Kentucky ransportation  and local officials discussed in an Aug. 12 planning meeting.
    Several city officials and Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent met with Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and engineering firm URS to hear feedback in the preliminary planning process.

  • Kick-started

    A large turnout of citizens and public officials at the launch of fundraising to repair the Odd Fellows lodge roof raised hopes that the organizers will meet their goal to restore the building that housed the fraternal organization since 1886.
    New Castle city officials, represented by Main Street Manager Jeff Thoke and Joe Yates, the chairman of the preservation committee, have been working with members of Washington Lodge No. 1513 to find a way to replace the roof that collapsed after a heavy March snowstorm.

  • Builders raise new sanctuary in Smithfield

    A new sanctuary for Smithfield Baptist Church soars toward the heavens after a week of work by the Baptist Builders, Blake-Moore Construction and church members.
    Having long ago demolished the sanctuary that dated back to 1871, the beginning of construction on Aug. 8 released a lot of pent-up prayers. Members decorated the framing and the foundation with Bible verses, personal messages and children’s hand prints in many magic marker colors.

  • Recognizing history-making women in Kentucky

    Last week, the United States celebrated the 95th anniversary of women’s right to vote, a milestone made possible by the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

    Kentucky was the 23rd state to ratify that amendment, but it did not clear its final legislative hurdle until Tennessee became the 36th in Aug. 1920.  Interestingly, that decision was a close one, occurring only when a young legislator voted in favor at the request of his mother.

  • Smoothing over the rough patches

    Unusual as it might be, I believe one item from a honey-do list may have cemented itself as my new favorite hobby. It can cover up many of the pockmarks and blemishes in life.

    My wife Beth pushed the agenda, setting in proverbial stone what she wanted me to tackle next, by bringing home a bucket of cement patching compound and a trowel.