Today's News

  • Warriors slay Wyverns


    The Eminence Warriors hosted the St. Francis Wyverns Jan. 31 and came from behind for a 76-69 victory.

    After the Wyverns scored the opening basket, the Warriors took a 4-2 lead on baskets by Dre Wright and Dakadrian Saunders.

    The lead seesawed back and forth until the Wyverns scored six straight points to take a 13-10 lead with 2:25 left in the opening period.

    Leading 15-14 with 1:27 left in the period, St. Francis scored the final two baskets to lead 19-14 going into the second period.

  • EHS drop three games


    The EHS Warriors girls’ team traveled to Gallatin County Jan. 31 to take on the Lady Wildcats and fell 61-47.

    “We got off to a decent start,” EHS Coach Jerry Skeeter said. “We were only down 12-10 at the end of the first period.”

    But the Warriors went cold on offense during the second period and were outscored 11-5 by Gallatin County to trail at halftime 23-15.

  • Lady Cats defeat Warriors, Lady Demons


    Round one of the female version of the local rivalry came late this year due inclement weather as the Henry County Lady Cats hosted the Eminence Warriors Jan. 30. The Lady Cats had to mount a comeback to take round one  and get their second distict win of the season.

    It was all Eminence in the early going as they pulled out to a 10-2 lead. Lexi Tillett, Emilie Ethington, Kenya Vargas and Tavi West all scored in the opening run for the Warriors.

  • School briefs for Feb. 7, 2018

    EIS to host district Governor’s Cup
    On Saturday, Feb. 10, local schools will gather at Eminence Elementary School to take part in the District Governor’s Cup Competition, an academic event sponsored by the Kentucky Association for Academic Competition, according to a news release.
    Participating schools are Eastern Elementary, Owen County Elementary and Eminence Elementary. Governor’s Cup features eight events, including the quick recall event, which is the only one open to the public.
    Quick recall begins at 11:30 a.m.

  • What should I be doing with my tax savings?

    Tax refund season: It’s like Christmas come really early! Or maybe it is just late?
    Either way, tax refund season is an excellent opportunity to begin the new year by making wise financial decisions.
    According to the Internal Revenue Service, the average tax refund in 2016 was about $3,050.
    Historically, Americans have found a wide variety of uses for their tax refunds, which range all the way from saving to spending and everything in between.
    But maybe you have wondered, what should I be doing with my tax return?

  • Quarterly volunteer recognized
  • After life-threatening illness, mother and daughter find new causes

    After a potentially life threatening bout with her Crohn’s disease and septic shock in 2016, Lyndi Carnal pulled through with a heart to help others.
    Mother Tiffany also found a cause to work on, after fearing the doctors relied far too much on addictive medications in her daughter’s treatment. Tiffany went on a crusade to promote natural alternatives to pharmaceuticals.
    Doctors diagnosed Lyndi with Crohn’s at 14. She faced numerous hospitalizations due to complications from the autoimmune disease. At 17, Lyndi was gravely ill in Cincinnati Children’s Hospital during December 2016.

  • Social media fears cause a virtual nervous breakdown

    Is there any word more apt to describe the recent eruption of parental concern on social media over talk of violence at Henry County High School than hysteria?
    It’s unfortunate that instances of school shootings happen so often and that they come to our attention to spur so much fear, but that’s where we are.
    These factors apparently contributed to a breakdown of trust of the decision-making abilities of the educators who are charged with taking care of the students during the day.

  • Town hall: State budget needs more revenue, fewer ed cuts

    The vast majority of questions put to state Sen. Paul Hornback, R-Shelbyville, and Rep. Rick Rand, D-Bedford, by participants at Saturday’s town hall meeting concerned proposed cuts by Gov. Matt Bevin to education — transportation and teacher pensions — as well as the possibility of raising new revenue.
    Kentucky’s budget shortfall remains at $1 billion, and elected officials continue working during the General Assembly session to address the situation.
    But both legislators agreed that the draconian cuts suggested by the governor will not stand.

  • State budget proposal cuts funds for Henry County by 8 percent

    Henry County Fiscal Court has joined the ranks of those objecting to the cuts to the state budget proposed by Gov. Matt Bevin. Driven by a sizeable shortfall in state pension plan funding, Bevin sought to trim much state spending and eliminate 70 programs, drawing criticism from different quarters, especially when it comes to public and higher education.