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Today's News

  • Our local churches are treasures in plain sight

    Whatever our economic status, we all have treasures — items from which we will be parted only as a last resort.
    As I look around the room in which I am writing this article, I see books. Lots of books.
    Books are among my most prized possessions.
    Should I some day have to downsize and not have room for them all, I already know there are some books from which I will not be parted.
    They will go with me even if I have to stack them on my bed.
    Some things are treasures because of what they are.
    Others are prized because of who gave them to us and/or what they represent.

  • I resolve to improve by strictly observing the Golden Rule

    New Years resolutions. We’ve all made them. We’ve all broken them. So, why make them?
    The reason to create — and, hopefully, stick to — our plans is that repetition and persistence help develop muscle memory.
    This could become a reflex we use to reach our goals. And a new year is a great time for a fresh beginning to get rid of habits that either hold us back or harm others.
    I don’t usually make resolutions, but this year, I’ve created a laundry list of goals for 2018.

  • Get more from pastures with rotational grazing

    Since I have started working in Henry County and learning the county, one thing is always very prominent with the farmers here. They are very passionate about their pastures and hay, and on many days, I will receive forage questions for eight straight hours.
    I can recommend one management practice that’s not widely used, but can help increase pasture forage yields. That is rotational grazing.

  • Conquer the indoors while kids are on break

    School holidays are fun and yet challenging times for caregivers — your patience may be wearing thin as you try to think of activities that will keep children occupied.
    There are a number of indoor activities that you can do in your home that will keep your child occupied for hours at a time, and they don’t require travel or money or the use of electronics. So that you and your child enjoy the activity, keep your child’s unique interests in mind.
    Listed below are some indoor activities that you may wish to try:

  • 80th birthday - Darlene Winiecki

    Darlene celebrated her 80th birthday with family and friends at the Bethlehem Missionary Baptist Church on Saturday Jan. 6.
    Her children are Kim Williams, Kevin Marsee (Maria), Jay Winiecki (Melyssa), Tammy Murphy (Kevin) and Shaun Winiecki (Chyree). She has eight grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

  • KYTC recognizes Roads Scholars
  • More candidates sign up for 2018 elections

    A few races have shaped up as more candidates file with the Henry County Clerk’s office to participate in the 2018 elections.
    With candidate filing set to close Jan. 30, two people have filed to run for Henry County judge-executive. They are Bonnie Martin-Duke, a Republican, and incumbent John Logan Brent, a Democrat.
    Another countywide race involves the sheriff’s position. The two candidates to register include current law enforcement officer Keith Perry, a Republican, and Danny R. Stivers, a Democrat.
    For Henry County Fiscal Court, so far two districts have contested seats.

  • Tristan Ridge to open in February

    Tristan Ridge apartments for seniors will open in February in Eminence after three years of planning and more than a year under construction, according to the developers.
    One of the biggest development projects in Eminence in recent years, the Woda Group pursued the $6.7 million, 44-unit complex after receiving tax credits from the state, said Tammy Stansbury, vice president of the Woda Group. This funding will help keep the rents lower for the 55 and older seniors who will reside there.

  • Musical Journey

    Michele de Bruijin may sing the blues as the Sugar Queen, but she feels upbeat about the release of her debut album “340 Blues.”
    Those who graduated from Henry County High School in 1982 may remember her better as Michele Whigham, daughter of the late Dan and Velma Whigham, who lived in Smithfield. Dan was a farmer and Velma kept the bridal registry at Cherry House in La Grange.
    After she left Smithfield, her love of music has taken de Bruijin around the world.
    Her appreciation of music began during her youth here.

  • Pleasureville tries to clean up by hiring Durbin, too

    Though some Pleasureville residents reported they felt unfairly singled out in the city’s new push on ordinance enforcement, Joe Durbin told the city commission he’s trying to get 25 people to clean up their properties.
    Not long after the City of New Castle hired Durbin as its new code enforcement official, working five hours per week, representatives of Pleasureville met with him and asked him to take on similar responsibilities in their city, too.
    As a result, Durbin gave his first activity report at Pleasureville City Commission at the Jan. 2 meeting.