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Today's News

  • Soil sampling now could reap benefits later

    I know this might be early, but most farmers are already thinking about next year’s crop. The first step to planning is to know what you have, and for tobacco or row crops, a soil sample could be the difference between a bumper crop and a loss.
    Soil sampling is the only way to allow the landowner to know exactly how much of a nutrient is present in the soil. Most soil samples will tell pH, phosphorus levels, potassium levels and a few micronutrient levels.

  • Lights, camera, action

    The 4-H Drama Day Camp recently met to learn more about performance art.  Participants learned stage terms and definitions.  Exercises were taught using improvisation techniques and charades, as well as teaching the youth poly-rhythmic drumming.  
    These techniques brought them to a higher level of performance.  Members also helped create the backdrops for a play and helped create costumes.  

  • Don’t let a backyard barbeque disaster spoil the party

    These tips will help make sure the special barbeque you plan for family and friends doesn’t end with a bout of food poisoning.  The Partnership for Food Safety Education suggests that we:
    •Always marinate foods in the refrigerator, not on the counter or outdoors. Don’t use sauce that was used to marinate raw meat or poultry on cooked food. Boil used marinade before applying to cooked food or reserve a portion of the unused marinade to use as a sauce.

  • Remembering fight for freedoms

    Over 200 years ago, our Founding Fathers put their lives on the line to create a new country in which freedom reigned. These men had a vision of a nation unafraid to face its enemies and win. We, the people of the United States, have faced insurmountable odds since our young country’s conception but continue to fight for our God-given rights unique to the United States of America.

  • Reviews amendments
  • Brent: New staff is ready to serve county

    The one characteristic of “local” government that I think citizens most appreciate is accessibility. In a day of automated operators, telephone prompts and websites, it is refreshing to call a number, get a friendly person on the other end and have your question answered.  
    It is equally nice to be able to walk into an office without an appointment and have someone that you know, or at least know of, assist you with your business, questions and problems.  

  • News briefs for July 5, 2017

    Bookmobile schedule
    The Henry County Public Library has recently released an updated schedule for its bookmobile, effective this summer. Evening and weekend hours are:
    •First and third Tuesdays from 5 to 6 p.m. at Eminence Village
    •Second and fourth Tuesdays from 5 to 6 p.m. at Windy Hills Apartments
    •First and third Thursdays from 4 to 4:55 p.m. at Lake View Apartments
    •First and third Thursdays from 5 to 6 p.m. at Campbellsburg Community Center
    •Second and fourth Thursdays from 5 to 6 p.m. at Osage Estates

  • Henry considers, Eminence modifies drug testing policy

    While county government, churches and local support groups are engaging in a battle against substance abuse in Henry County, schools are also making policy changes to join the fight.
    Both districts recently reviewed policies regarding random drug testing in schools, making changes to suit their respective student populations.

  • All students can now eat for free

    Every child enrolled in either Eminence Independent Schools (EIS) or Henry County Public Schools (HCPS) can eat two meals a day at school for free next year.
    Both districts recently added onto the participating schools in the Community Eligibility Program (CEP), part of the National School lunch Program (NSLP) administered by the U.S.D.A.

  • Couple strives to serve community and family through business

    To the Fitzgerald family, Sammy’s Bakery in Eminence is much more than a place to offer handmade donuts and coffee. It’s an investment in family, in community and in an underused craft.
    Micah and Kyla Fitzgerald, parents of four, worked meticulously and lovingly to revamp the former Sam’s Place service station into their own sustainable business in order to bring balance to their work and family lives.