Today's News

  • After life-threatening illness, mother and daughter find new causes

    After a potentially life threatening bout with her Crohn’s disease and septic shock in 2016, Lyndi Carnal pulled through with a heart to help others.
    Mother Tiffany also found a cause to work on, after fearing the doctors relied far too much on addictive medications in her daughter’s treatment. Tiffany went on a crusade to promote natural alternatives to pharmaceuticals.
    Doctors diagnosed Lyndi with Crohn’s at 14. She faced numerous hospitalizations due to complications from the autoimmune disease. At 17, Lyndi was gravely ill in Cincinnati Children’s Hospital during December 2016.

  • Social media fears cause a virtual nervous breakdown

    Is there any word more apt to describe the recent eruption of parental concern on social media over talk of violence at Henry County High School than hysteria?
    It’s unfortunate that instances of school shootings happen so often and that they come to our attention to spur so much fear, but that’s where we are.
    These factors apparently contributed to a breakdown of trust of the decision-making abilities of the educators who are charged with taking care of the students during the day.

  • Town hall: State budget needs more revenue, fewer ed cuts

    The vast majority of questions put to state Sen. Paul Hornback, R-Shelbyville, and Rep. Rick Rand, D-Bedford, by participants at Saturday’s town hall meeting concerned proposed cuts by Gov. Matt Bevin to education — transportation and teacher pensions — as well as the possibility of raising new revenue.
    Kentucky’s budget shortfall remains at $1 billion, and elected officials continue working during the General Assembly session to address the situation.
    But both legislators agreed that the draconian cuts suggested by the governor will not stand.

  • State budget proposal cuts funds for Henry County by 8 percent

    Henry County Fiscal Court has joined the ranks of those objecting to the cuts to the state budget proposed by Gov. Matt Bevin. Driven by a sizeable shortfall in state pension plan funding, Bevin sought to trim much state spending and eliminate 70 programs, drawing criticism from different quarters, especially when it comes to public and higher education.

  • Eminence is a blessed home for preacher

    Pastor Michael Thomas, 61, preaches to the congregation at Pleasant View Baptist in Shelby County, but has lived his entire life in Eminence, except for a few years in the U.S. Air Force. He met his wife Valerie at Eminence High School, raised two daughters and enjoys friendships old and new.
    Born and raised in Eminence, Thomas attended the town’s First Baptist Church with his family.
    “I grew up there,” he said. “If you lived in my father’s house, you went to church on Sunday and sometimes we’d stay all day until 5:30 — whenever they were ready to leave.”

  • New Management

    The community of Pleasureville got its wish — Main Street Cafe will continue operating under new management.
    Instead of Rachel Yoder and sister Clara running the restaurant and bakery in downtown Pleasureville, the family of Joe and Traci Throne and Angie Beavers will sell meals and donuts alongside the farmers market produce, gifts and arts and crafts.
    After learning that building owner Cheryl Clark wanted to find someone else to operate the eatery, Beavers found it was a perfect opportunity for the farm-to-table restaurant she has long wanted to open.

  • Fight breaks out over attempted marijuana theft

    Local juveniles allegedly attempted to steal marijuana at gunpoint in a Jan. 23 incident at Eminence Village Apartments, according to Eminence Police Chief Kevin Kemper. This led to a fight among an unspecified number of juveniles that police had to break up.
    Police received a report of several juveniles fighting at the apartments, the chief said. When Officer Phillip Parham responded, he found the fight had moved to the end of Dobner Way and then onto the school parking lot near the ball fields at Crabb Avenue.

  • Eminence native went on to study at UK, work at Vanderbilt

    It’s not easy being a Wildcat fan when you live in the Music City — especially when you work for another SEC school.
    No matter what, Rachel Sims, an alumna of the communication sciences and disorders graduate program in the University of Kentucky College of Health Sciences, will always bleed blue, according to a University of Kentucky News profile of the Wildcat alumna.
    Originally from Eminence, Sims now lives in Nashville, where she works for Vanderbilt University Medical Center as a speech language pathologist (SLP).

  • Five local races will appear on primary ballot

    While there’s interest in a few other races in the May 22 primary, the race for the Henry County Judge-Executive Office seems like the one to watch. It’s the only local office with candidates vying for the party nomination among both Democrats and Republicans.

    As incumbent John Logan Brent seeks to return to office, he faces a challenge from fellow Democrat Glenn Baxter. On the Republican ballot, Bonnie Martin-Duke and Danny Cravens will compete to seek who will appear on the ballot in November.

  • May 22 primary to feature five races

    Voters will decide five local party nominations during the primary election May 22, including for the Democrat and Republican candidates for judge-executive.

    Two Democrats filed for the judge-executive office with the county clerk by the Jan. 30 deadline including incumbent John Logan Brent and challenger Glenn Baxter.

    On the Republican ballot, voters will choose between Bonnie Martin-Duke and Danny Cravens for judge-executive.