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Today's News

  • Lady Cats down Gallatin; Fall to Collins, Carroll

    The Henry County Lady Cats defeated the Gallatin County Lady Wildcats Thursday night in Warsaw to finish 4-4 in the district and get the number three seed for the district tournament. The Cats will take on Carroll County, who finished as the second seed.

    The Lady Cats dominated Gallatin County with a strong start and never let up winning, 25-14, 25-9, 25-12.

  • Wildcats shut out Owen; Fall to Carroll

    In a game marred by violent conduct the Henry County Wildcat soccer team pulled out a 2-0 victory over the Owen County Rebels for a regular season sweep.

    The game ended early as both teams and officials agreed not to continue after a third red card was issued against the Rebels.

    Wildcats defender Isaac Steverson sustained a bloody nose and lip after he was pummeled by a Rebel player following a slide tackle.

    Earlier Gavin Jameson was hit in the head and face by a Rebel defender who was also red-carded.

  • Filing and petition delay EIS tax rate

    Henry County residents living in the Eminence Independent School District will have to wait for a second billing with the  district’s tax rate.

    According to Henry County Clerk Juanita Lashley the Henry County tax bill did not include the district’s tax rate, which needed to be established by Sept. 15 per statute. The Kentucky Revised Statutes rule that any rate more than four percent shall be subject to recall after 45 days.

  • Methodists United

    The New Castle and Eminence United Methodist congregations showed faith requires sacrifice and vision.

    The Kentucky Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church voted to merge the two congregations into one church in June. On Sunday, Oct. 6, the two congregations celebrated the merger as, ‘one church, two cities.’

    For 135 years, Eminence United Methodist Church went through phases of growth. A congregation made of just eight families met in homes and later the opera house that was above Slaughter’s Department Store on Broadway.

  • Eversole mills sustainability

    Randy Eversole knows wood.

    His grandfather shoveled woodchips from underneath a sawmill’s blade as his first job.

    By the early 1970s, Eversole started his own mill and can run 7,000 feet of hardwood trees through his 56-inch circle sawmill, which is powered by a 238 Detroit Diesel road tractor engine.

    He and his crew of two employees — Chris Doss and Cody Snider — mill hardwood and cedar much like mills did in pre-Civil War era.

  • P’ville to go fair?

    The City of Pleasureville could become the first city in Henry County to pass a fairness ordinance.

    Introduced during Monday night’s city commission meeting, the ordinance would bar discrimination in real estate rental or sale, or in employment, based on race, color or national origin; sex and/or gender, including gender identity; religion; age; and/or sexual orientation, either real or perceived.

  • Hanging history may still haunt Henry County

    Our past always comes back and haunts us.

    For Henry County, or at least the courthouse yard, the past never left.

    An apparition still ‘hangs’ around from an atrocity committed in 1868. Whether fashioned as a scapegoat or their fate was a true swift answer of unmerciful justice, Henry County once held the notorious record for executing the youngest person, a female, in the state.

  • Kentuckians rush to state site for health insurance

    Kentucky’s health benefit exchange hosted about 60,000 unique visitors looking for affordable health care on the Kynect website on Oct. 1, and the interest for health care continues to grow.

    The Kynect website opened for business at 12 a.m. on Oct. 1 and by 8 a.m. 24,000 users visited the site, filing 1,015 applications.

  • Shelby woman heads health insurance co-op

    By Molly Burchett/Kentucky Health News

     

    FRANKFORT, Ky. – A Shelby County resident is heading a little-known but key part of federal health reform in Kentucky, a new kind of health insurance – a cooperative that is neither public, like Medicare and Medicaid, or run for profit, like traditional insurance companies.

    Janie Miller is CEO of the Kentucky Health Cooperative, which began to offer coverage this week, with the opening of the state health-insurance exchange.

  • Kelley indicted in hatchet murder of boyfriend

    By Kenny Colston

    Landmark News Service

    A Pewee Valley woman charged with killing her boyfriend with a hatchet has been indicted by a grand jury and will proceed to a jury trial.

    Gail Kelley, 51, was arrested for murder on July 6, after police received a report of a possible murder.  At the time, Kelley told police she struck Michael T. Evans, 44, in the head with a hatchet, which was found wrapped in a bloody towel in a trash can in the driveway.

    Kelley appeared in Oldham Circuit Court on Thursday for an arraignment post-indictment.