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Today's News

  • Residents want to preserve city’s past

    The pending arrival of a CVS pharmacy drove a handful of concerned residents to gather last week and discuss the need for a preservation ordinance.

    Eric Whisman, education and outreach coordinator for Preservation Kentucky, and Eminence resident Lance Minnis asked concerned citizens to meet regarding the development which may result in the demolition of several buildings tied to the county and city’s past.

  • Every day is different for Treece

    Every day is different for Scott Treece and that’s just how he wants it.

    Treece, Public Works Director for the city of New Castle, does more between 7 and 10 a.m. than most will do in an eight-hour shift.

    Treece starts his day by reading the city’s master water meters as they enter the city from the county water lines. New Castle has about 15 miles of water lines within the city and consumes about 60,000 gallons daily. Treece records usage from the meters in order to track not just money owed by the city to county for water usage, but also for leaks.

  • United Citizens: Helping people succeed at their dreams

    Doug Scholsnagle loves to help people succeed and realize their dreams.

    Schlosnagle, CEO of United Citizens Bank and Trust, came to the bank in 2005 with a background in helping farmers do that while employed at Farm Credit Services.

    The bank’s mission statement expresses the need for a locally owned community bank is paramount and Schlosnagle affirms that the bank continues to attract people to a business built on service.

  • Life 101 is going hybrid

    Henry County High School plans to offer two classes online starting next year for seniors.

    Tim Abrams, Henry County Public Schools Superintendent, will meet with teachers and nail down logistics for the class in the coming weeks. Abrams hopes the ‘blended’ learning classes — mixing an online course with classroom instruction — will give a convenient alternative for students who need flexibility.

  • Culture Shock

    Eric Raisor thought he knew it all. That was before he went to another country.

    Raisor enlisted in the U.S. Army in June 2010 and serves with the A. Co 412th CAB as a specialist in the RC-North in Mazar-e Sharif  in northern Afghanistan, .

    Raisor said once he traveled outside the United States the culture shock woke him up.

  • Phantom energy and reducing your bills

    Energy costs are monthly expenses that fluctuate throughout the year, since much of our heating and cooling usage depends on Mother Nature. However, you can make your home more energy efficient and reduce some of your energy expenses by locating and switching off sources of phantom energy in your home.

  • Tobacco production and GAP training

    The UK Cooperative Extension Service is offering a Tobacco Production and GAP training meeting  from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, at the Shelby County Extension office.  The Burley Tobacco Growers Cooperative will be sponsoring a lunch, so please contact us at 845-2811 to reserve your spot. 

    The Production Meeting will include a variety update, new insecticide use, sucker control, BlackShank control, and label changes that impact float production. Dr. Bob Pearce and Dr. Kenny Seebold will be the principal presenters. 

  • Lady Cats win at the line

     

  • Warriors end Cats' season

    The Eminence Warriors used tough inside defense and aggressive offense to hold on for a 59-57 victory over the Henry County Wildcats in the first round of the 31st district tournament Monday night.

    Henry County — who found themselves down 12 points with 50.9 seconds left — put on a furious rally that came up short as Landon New raced down court with 4 seconds to go and missed a desperation runner under pressure.

  • Where is Cats' Lady Luck?

    I have never seen anything like the run of bad luck surrounding the Henry County High School girls’ basketball team this season.
    I’ve seen teams lose a key player or two to injuries. I have seen teams lose players due to transferring out of the district. I have seen teams go through a stretch of illness.
    The Henry County Lady Cats have experienced all of these things this year and it has left the roster depleted.
    Not only have they had transfers and injuries and illness, but it has involved players who were seen as key contributors to the team.