Today's News

  • Grant to help with online database

    The Berry Center in New Castle recently received a $1,500 grant from the Kentucky Local History Trust Fund through the Kentucky Historical Society.
    Archivists at the Berry Center will use the money for collections management, according to archivist Michelle Guthrie, who wrote the grant application. The non-profit center’s mission is to preserve Wendell Berry’s work, as well as father his John Berry Sr. and his brother John Berry Jr.’s agrarian legacy.
    Established in 2011, the archive is located at the center’s Agrarian Culture Center and Bookstore in New Castle.

  • Fatal wrecks down in 2017 on Ky. roads, first decrease since 2013

    Preliminary figures indicate highway fatalities in Kentucky declined in 2017 to 770, down from 834 in 2016, a news release from state public safety officials. According to the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety (KOHS) and the Kentucky State Police (KSP), this is Kentucky’s first roadway fatality decrease since 2013, when 638 fatalities were recorded.
    KOHS Executive Director Dr. Noelle Hunter commends Kentuckians for taking responsibility behind the wheel.

  • Louisville man tries to flee from police

    When local authorities sought out a man with outstanding warrants Jan. 10, they captured their target after a foot chase and, as a bonus, seized 17 grams of crystal meth, according to information from the Henry County Sheriff’s Office.
    Authorities believed they could find Michael Joseph Lindsey, 19, of Louisville at a home in the 3500 block of La Grange Road, and Henry County Deputy Kyle Stewart and Sgt. Chase Dewitt went to see if that was true.
    When they went to the home, Lindsey tried to flee.

  • Henry County educators seek public input on graduate profiles

    Readying students for the future is an essential goal of Henry County Public Schools, educators say. In a move to ensure that the schools prepare students for the future, local educational institutions are incorporating graduate profiles.
    Henry County Public Schools are developing a similar program that stresses core competencies and skills.
    After completing extensive research, Henry County educators continue formulating their own graduate profile that HCPS Superintendent Terry Price said stresses core competencies and skills students need before they graduate.

  • Loss of Dr. Bob shocks educators

    Dr. Robert “Bob” Wagoner, 66, former executive director of the Kentucky Retired Teachers Association (KRTA) and superintendent of the Henry County Public Schools, died Tuesday, Jan. 9, from complications after he contracted the flu. Throughout his 26-year career, Wagoner rose quickly through Kentucky’s educational ranks — as a teacher, counselor, assistant principal, principal and assistant superintendent for Bullitt, Woodford and Henry counties and later superintendent in HCPS. He also had served as the director of finance for Kentucky schools.

  • Suetholz to run for Senate; more file for election

    A Democrat has emerged to challenge the incumbent from Senate District 20 in the 2018 elections.
    Dave Suetholz, a labor attorney who lives on a farm outside of Eminence, recently announced his intention to seek the office currently held by Republican incumbent Paul Hornback, according to a news release.
    “I’m running for state Senate for the same reasons that led me to practice labor law for working people,” Suetholz said in a news release. “I was taught that we have an obligation to leave the world better than we found it.”

  • Literary Q&A

    Eminence fourth-graders met nationally known children’s author Chris Grabenstein during a Skype session Tuesday, Jan. 9. Students got to ask the author questions they prepared beforehand.
    Teachers on the Fantastic Fourths team, as fourth-graders at Eminence Elementary are known, assigned Grabenstein’s book, “Mr. Lemoncello’s Library,” to read. Students also watched the Nickelodeon network movie based on the book. Grabenstein said that Lemoncello took two years to write — the longest of any he penned.

  • Juvenile justice grants $174,000 to help youth

    A coalition working in Henry, Oldham and Trimble counties have received a $174,410 grant for the Youth Strong Initiative to build on existing mentoring efforts and to implement a parental training program, according to information from the Kentucky Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.
    The $900,000 dedicated to the statewide grants came from the savings by turning to more community-based services, treatment programs or alternatives to out-of-home placement for youth involved in the juvenile justice system, according to a news release.

  • Be mindful of your eating habits to lose weight

    One of the most common New Year’s resolutions we make is to lose weight. Eating the correct portions of nutritious foods and engaging in physical activity are two keys to successful weight loss.
    One way that may help you keep your portions under control is to be mindful of what you eat.
    Mindful eating means you eat slowly and enjoy your food with all your senses.
    When you are more mindful of what you eat, you may become more aware of when you become full, which prevents overeating.

  • Here’s looking forward to an exciting 2018

    By Holly Kinderman
    Henry County Chamber of Commerce