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Today's News

  • Warriors rout Raiders, fall to Dragons

    sports@hclocal.com

    The Eminence Warriors traveled to Bedford Thursday night to take on the Trimble County Raiders and came away with an 84-58 win in their regular season finale.

    The Warriors were up 15-11 at the end of the first period.

    “The guys came out with a wonderful attitude and good body language before the game,” EHS Assistant Coach Ray Valentine said. “I could tell they were ready to play, but came out slow and maybe rushed a couple of shots.”

  • Wildcats drop games to Walton, Shelby

    sports@hclocal.com

    After trailing throughout the first half, the host Henry County Wildcats took the lead in the third quarter and then battled back and forth with the Shelby County Rockets the rest of the way before falling in the final minutes.

    The Rockets opened the game with a 3-pointer and an inside basket to go ahead 5-0 with 6:32 left.

    Tyler Gray scored inside for the Wildcats’ first basket with 6:01 left in the opening period before Shelby County hit two free throws to restore their five-point lead.

  • Lady Cats blast Villa Madonna, 47-27

    sports@hclocal.com

    The Henry County Lady Cats traveled to Northern Kentucky Saturday to take on the Villa Madonna Blue Lightning and came away with a 47-27 victory.

    The Lady Cats jumped on Villa Madonna early and led 12-4 going into the second period.

    “We opened up in our press defense and were able to create a lot of turnovers,” HCHS Coach Jim Hook said. “We did a good job of getting to the rim and drawing fouls too.”

    The Lady Cats kept the pressure up in the second period and led 26-12 at halftime.

  • School briefs for Feb. 15, 2017

    Smith graduates Summa Cum Laude

    Fleet Smith graduated from Kent State University Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology, according to a news release. Smith is among nearly 3,000 students who received bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, associate and educational specialist degrees during Kent State’s 2016 Fall Commencement ceremony.

    Howard earns honors at Centre College

  • Eminence students tee off in golf club
  • Eminence First-graders tell who they melt for in book launch
  • New Castle Elementary School earns Energy Star certification

    New Castle Elementary School has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Energy Star certification, which signifies that the building performs in the top 25 percent of similar facilities nationwide for energy efficiency and meets strict energy efficiency performance levels set by the EPA, according to a news release from the federal agency.

  • USDA’s latest numbers on Ky. cattle

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) recently released the cattle report, showing little change in beef cow numbers, but a continued decline in milk cows in Kentucky.
    “This report shows cattle production remains a vital part of the Commonwealth’s agricultural economy,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “In 2015, gross receipts from cattle were $927 million, the second leading commodity behind broiler production.

  • Drink up: Get enough water to promote health and wellness

    Most of us hear early on that we should drink water for good health, but some of us may not know why it is so important.
    More than two-thirds of our bodies are made of water. It helps lubricate our joints, and without water our organs could not properly function.
    Water is also essential in helping us remove waste from our bodies.
    If you don’t consume enough water, you run the risk of becoming dehydrated.
    Dehydration can cause headaches, mood changes, fever, dizziness, rapid heartbeat and kidney problems among others.

  • Warm winter could affect tall fescue toxicosis

    This warm winter has been nice because of 50 degree weather and not having to feed as much hay.
    However, this warm winter has played havoc for many farmers, such as increased mud and lately I have heard from Dr. Ray Smith from the University of Kentucky that this mild winter is likely to cause higher than average concentration of ergovaline in tall fescue.
    Tall fescue is still widely planted throughout Kentucky because of its yield potential and ruggedness, but tall fescue is naturally infected with an endophytic fungus that produces ergovaline.