.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Track Cats compete at Oldham, Collins

    The Henry County Wildcat track team traveled to Oldham County for their first track meet of the season on Apr. 8 and had several impressive performances.

    Cathryn Fischer led the girls’ team with a fifth place finish in the 300 meter hurdles and a seventh place finish in the long jump.

    Ricki Carter had a fifth place finish in the 100-meter hurdles.

    Tierra Allison had a strong showing in the throwing events. She placed sixth in the discus and fifth in the shot put. Both her throws were personal records to start the season.

  • Demons down Warrios in All A

    The second and third innings told the story for the Warriors as Williamstown plated 10 runs in the second, including a grand slam home run, and six in the third to put the first round All A Classic regional tournament game away early.

     “We had a couple of errors with one out that would have gotten us out the inning before the grand slam,” Coach Jay Virgin said. “Six of those ten runs were unearned because we should have had three outs before they crossed the plate.”

  • EHS Student of the Week-Cole Lawson

    Cole is a junior on the Warriors’ baseball team.

    Parents-Tammy Lawson and Charlie Lawson

    What do you do for fun?

    Fishing and hunting.

    How about school clubs?

    Academic team, National Honor Society and Latin club.

    Favorite school subject and why:

    Science because that’s the kind of career field I want to go into. We get to do a lot of labs and stuff.

    Favorite TV shows:

    Kentucky Afield and Duck Dynasty.

    Favorite Movie:

    All the Sandlot movies.

  • Statewide spring wild turkey season opened Saturday

    Submitted by the Ky. Fish and Wildlife Dept.

     

    Hunters could have the long winter to thank for what is shaping up to be a good start to Kentucky’s statewide spring wild turkey season, which opened Saturday, April 12, and runs through May 4.

    “The timing of the first peak in gobbling and our season opener should be pretty close this year because the long winter somewhat delayed the arrival of spring,” said Steven Dobey, wild turkey program coordinator for the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

  • Divide and conquer strategy blurs vision

    Joseph Yates

    Average Joe

    A nice fellow has been traveling around the county lately, soliciting the assistance of others in helping those who are unable to help themselves. I intend to support his cause. I have seen his presentation twice—it is a gentle, soft-sell pitch in which he asks for our help. During both presentations he used the phrase “this is not a hand out.”

  • No budget, but several new laws will benefit Kentucky

    Traditionally, the last day of a legislative session is set aside just to consider any vetoes the governor may make.  Recently, however, the General Assembly has also used the time to wrap up a few lingering issues, and this year is no different.

  • New members boost county economy

    The Chamber of Commerce is always happy to welcome new members and we have several to introduce this month. CVS in Eminence, Homes Plus Realty owned by Robin Barmore, and Eminence Apothecary with pharmacist Drane Stephens in Eminence are looking forward to your checking out what they have to offer.

  • Public record for the week of April 16

    Eminence Police Arrests

    Billy Joe Young, 36, arrested April 11 on Fairview for Alcohol Intoxication in a public place, first and second offense

    John C. Wells, 19, arrested April 12 on Elm for operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol, less than 21 years of age

    HC Sheriff Arrests

    Denita Watkins, arrested April 11 by Rick Nelson for TBUT

    Justin Johnson, arrested April 10 by Rick Nelson two counts of failure to appear, contempt of court

    Kentucky State Police Arrests

  • Raising responsible children today
  • Black cherry trees can be dangerous

    When you drive through the rolling land in Henry County, you can find many black cherry trees, including some in farm fencerows. While standing upright, there is not much danger, but if one of these trees or a limb falls in a windstorm, there can be problems for livestock.

    The leaves of black cherry trees, especially wilted ones, are high in cyanic acid, which can kill livestock by depriving them of oxygen. You can reduce the likelihood of livestock losses due to wild black cherry trees by cutting them out of fencerows.