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Today's News

  • SB105 affects livestock producers

    Livestock producers, listen up! There is currently a bill being considered by our legislators that would seriously and negatively affect our ability to farm.

  • He could fix Anything

    Staff writer/photographer

    George Armstrong Sr., was known in Henry County as the man who could fix anything.

    Born March 9, 1907, the mechanically inclined Armstrong attended the King Street School in Eminence. The all black school housed elementary school through tenth-grade students.

    As a young man he apprenticed under Paul Land at an Eminence repair shop and worked with Land several years.

    By 1939, though, he was determined to go out on his own and opened Armstrong’s Garage and Repair on King Street.

  • Wild game ends with Eminence forfeit

    The Eminence Lady Warriors were on the verge of winning their second basketball game of the season, but instead were given a forfeit loss when the referees ruled the game was out of control with Eminence leading 50-47 and 2:12 left in regulation.

    Playing at Evangel Christian last Tuesday, Eminence coach Carter Martin was called for two technical fouls and eventually ejected from the game with 5:40 left in the final quarter and his team ahead by 18 points.

  • The candidate we want you to know about

    I was enjoying a nice ho-hum drive to work Feb. 3,when the rear end of an SUV caught my eye, and I had to turn around to get another look.

    Parked at the intersection of  Main and Cross Main in New Castle, the SUV had a campaign sticker for Bob Cook for Judge-Executive on the back window.

    The top of the sticker, of which I caught just a couple of words at first, was the part that made me turn my car around to take a second look.

    “The candidate the newspaper doesn’t want you to know about. Shhh!”

  • Warriors trying to put it together

    Trailing by just three points after the first quarter, the Eminence boys’ basketball team was playing near-perfect against the Shelby County Rockets last Tuesday night — the Warriors held an early lead, were tied 10-10 five minutes into the contest and had few mistakes against a squad that was supposed to run away with an unchallenged victory from tip-off.

  • Property ordinance is much needed

    I attended the Feb. 1 meeting of the Pleasureville City Council regarding the second reading of the proposed property maintenance ordinance.

  • Emotional win for the Ladycats

    Emotions were running high on Saturday as the Henry County girls’ basketball team beat Kentucky Country Day 51-39 on Senior Night.

    The three seniors — Kelsey Mings, Brittany Crawford and Kelley Evridge — were recognized individually, along with their parents, before tip-off with plenty of tears and hugs. The emotions left the Ladycats a little flat in the early going, but they eventually shook off the sluggish start to take control and win by 12 points.

  • At least it was to the Saints

    I am shocked, but I’m still a Colts fan. On Sunday while Indianapolis was playing the New Orleans Saints in the Super Bowl, I was on the edge of my couch cheering for what I thought was a sure win. No doubt.

  • Woman’s club changes scholarship guidelines

    The Campbellsburg Woman’s Club has changed the guidelines and opened its two scholarships (Mildred B. Scott and Kathryn Dunaway) to all graduating seniors in Henry County.

    Packets have been supplied to Eminence Independent as well as Henry County High Schools.  Home-schooled students also are eligible to apply. School counselors will make information available to interested students.

    Home-schooled seniors should contact Mrs. Pepper McKee at (502) 947-5509.

  • Tuesday morning snow brings ‘Every bit of 6 inches’

    While county roadways were mostly clear of drivers Tuesday morning, snow plow and salt crews were out in force — including Henry County Judge-Executive John Logan Brent.

    Working one of the county’s salt trucks, affectionately nicknamed the ‘salt shaker,’ Brent said the county already had received “every bit of the six inches” forecast.

    By midmorning, the snow was falling so hard and fast that roads that already had been plowed didn’t look it.