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Today's News

  • Judge to lawyer: ‘Are you crazy?

    A Lockport man charged in November with breaking into the same home twice in one night and assaulting two people there is in jail, after being out on medical furlough.

    Last week, in Henry County Circuit Court, Douglas Clay Moore’s attorney, Matt Pippin, implored Judge Karen Conrad to keep his client out of jail due to injuries sustained when he was shot by a home owner in the alleged commission of a crime.

  • Eminence looking at Wi-Fi options

    During the January meeting of the Eminence City Council, Mayor Drane Stephens presented an idea that, if it became reality, would provide Wi-Fi access to the city.

    Monday night, the council heard options for the idea from Daniel Vogler of Liberty Communications. He said costs for Wi-Fi hardware units vary wildly, but suggested a mid-range option for Eminence. Access points run around $150 each.

  • BIRTH: Braxton McAlister

    Brent, Kara, Bryce, Katelyn and Brody announce the birth of their brother, Braxton McAlister, born January 8, 2011. He weighed 9 pounds 4 ¼ ounces.
    Parents are Mike and Shelly McAlister, Simpson County, formerly of Henry County.
    Grandparents are Tom and Pam McAlister of Bethlehem and Dale and Linda Hanson of Simpson County.

  • Pair arrested for trafficking hydrocodone

    Two Henry County residents were arrested Feb. 13 in Carroll County while allegedly trying to sell hydrocodone.

    Carroll County Sheriff Jamie Kinman said John P. Parker, 26, and Jessi M. Short, 19, both of New Castle were arrested at 7:01 p.m. Sunday night and charged with trafficking controlled substances second degree.

    Kinman said officers made the arrest during a controlled purchase that was allegedly made with the pair. He said Carrollton Police Department assisted the sheriff’s department.

  • Cattleman’s Association to meet on Feb. 28

    The Henry County Cattleman’s Association will meet at 6:30 p.m., Monday, Feb. 28, at the Henry County Extension Office. Looks like another great program has been planned by the Board of Directors. Leading off with a sponsored beef supper, the program will feature the ever popular veterinarian’s report, the FSA/NRCS update, a Phase I progress report, and a quick Extension report. Program sponsors will give a brief update on products and services available.

  • Local Buzz

    Arts & Crafts

    Free adult scrapbooking offered at the Eminence Community Life Center from 10 a.m. to noon, on Thursdays.

    Blood Drives
    Red Cross blood drive will be held from 2:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 15, at New Castle Christian Church, 260 S. Main St., New Castle.

    Chamber of Commerce
    The Henry County Chamber of Commerce will hold a networking dinner on Tuesday, March 29.
    The Patrick Henry Award dinner, honoring Martha Tarry Simpson, will be held Tuesday, May 17.

  • To get along, get acquainted with yourself

    Michael Duncan, Pastor, Eminence Baptist Church

  • Church Directory

    Apostolic Pentecostal Church
    Rev. James Maroney
    9255 Main St., Campbellsburg • 532-0200
    Sunday School, 6:30 p.m.; Worship 7:30 p.m.


    Ballardsville Baptist Church
    Gary French, Pastor
    4300 S. Hwy 53, Ballardsville • 222-9165
    Sunday Early Worship, 8:30 a.m.; Sunday Morning Worship, 10:45 a.m.

    Berea Christian Church
    Anne Gregory, Pastor
    685 Franklinton Rd., Pleasureville
    Sunday School 10 a.m.; Worship 11 a.m.

  • Patrick Henry Award winner chosen

    Submitted by Pat Wallace
    Henry County Chamber of Commerce

    One of the criteria for a person to receive the Patrick Henry Award, the most prestigious given in the county, is that the person has made a tremendous contribution to the betterment of the county and that the overall involvement of this person be without fanfare.

  • Gardening makes sense

    Gardening makes sense! Growing your own vegetables makes you feel self-sufficient and provides fresh, healthful food for you and your family.
    Your surplus crop can be frozen, canned, or stored in cool, dry locations for enjoyment and nourishment throughout the year. Your good labors in the garden can reward you with lower grocery bills, plus you’ll have the peace of mind knowing exactly what care has been taken of the food.