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Today's News

  • CU sewer project to include C’Burg

    Carrollton Utilities indicated their intent to seek funding for a regional sewer project that would, among other things, extend sewer service in Campbellsburg to the north side of I-71.

    During an informal meeting with Campbellsburg mayor Rex Morgan and concerned property and business owners, CU representative Terry Roach said a regional approach will make funding more likely. “(Projects) score higher when they’re regional,” he said.

  • Roosevelt Institute awards Freedom Medal to Wendell Berry

    Henry County native, and celebrated author, Wendell Berty has been awarded the Freedom Medal by the Roosevelt Institute in New York, N.Y.

    The award, presented last week, is part of a biennial ceremony that began honoring recipients in 1964 based on principles laid out in President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms speech, delivered to Congress in January 1941.

  • Ren Faire focuses on commerce, community

    The Kentucky Renaissance Faire continues using commerce as a way to focus on community.
    Ed and Linda Frederick and Holly Sprabary, Directors of the Kentucky Renaissance Faire, have put their ideas together at the round table for possible expansion and more entertaining events next season.
    Eminence Festivals and the Kentucky Highland Renaissance Fair will host the 5th Annual Halloween Festival on Oct. 26 at the fairgrounds with a collaborative cast of community and school organizations.

  • Take 5: Pat Wallace

    Basic Bio

    Harrodsburg native
    Graduated from Mercer County High School
    EKU bachelor’s in History and English
    HCHS English Teacher
    Executive Director Henry County Chamber of Commerce

    How did you end up teaching in Henry County and later at the chamber?

  • Smith-Berry hosting Susan G. Komen benefit

    There will be a Halloween Bash Benefit for the Susan G. Komen Foundation from 5 to 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 26, at Smith-Berry Vineyard and Winery on Drennon Road in New Castle. Come out and enjoy Halloween fun with a costume contest and enjoy dinner from 5-6 p.m. and music by Melody Resurrection. Tickets are $25 plus tax, with 20 percent of the cost of each ticket donated to the Susan G. Komen Foundation. For more information call 845-7091.
     

  • Campbellsburg bristles about economic development payment

    Campbellsburg will honor its commitment of $2,500 per year toward economic development in Henry County, though the commission had reservations about doing so.

    In September, Mayor Rex Morgan expressed concern about an invoice the city had received from Kentucky Connected, the six-county regional economic development group.

  • County update: Economic development

    By John Logan Brent
    Henry County Judge-Executive

    Like most rural Kentucky communities, Henry County’s local economy is very diversified. Agriculture, construction, retail, and industry make up the bulk of our private sector economy. The state of Kentucky and a majority of counties, including ours, have economic development programs in some form. Though the state and counties use the term “economic development” in a broad sense, it almost always means the recruitment and expansion of industry.

  • I need to work harder at connecting

    This was written during the autumn of 1988.

    At times over the past several years, I’ve attempted to square up the rounded corners of my life, to clean up the accumulation of broken, dead limbs in the yard, the coating of dust on the top of the door that never gets wiped off.

  • Domestic violence is a nationwide problem

    On a typical day across the country, our domestic violence programs help more than 64,000 victims, 1,100 of whom live right here in Kentucky.

    But lack of funds, space and personnel mean another 10,000 have to wait for the services they need, including almost 90 here in the commonwealth.

  • Once known as the Village Inn, house home to haunting history

    Many ghost stories contain a common thread.

    A tragic thread of love lost or the violence of the criminally insane commonly haunt the past, but these two haunts supposedly continue in the present under one roof.

    Thomas Smith known as the ‘Mercantile Prince of the West’ was born in 1790 when Kentucky was still part of Virginia. His father Nicholas Smith married Mary Jones and settled on 500 acres near New Castle. Smith inherited the farm from his father, but took an interest after his education in trading.