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Today's News

  • Poison hemlock a problem for livestock

    As you travel around Henry County and most of the state, you probably notice the tall white flowered plants beside the roadways, along the fences, and out into some fields.  The plant is Poison Hemlock, and it looks as if it is rapidly becoming the new Nodding Head Thistle as a problem for farmers. 

  • Henry County Homemakers celebrate 74 years

    The Henry County Extension Homemakers celebrated their 74th annual meeting this past week at the Extension Office.   The meeting opened with a silent auction to raise funds for the Kentucky Extension Homemaker Ovarian Cancer program and a collection of personal care items that was donated to the Family Resource Center.

  • Sharpshooters shine at youth challenge

    The Kentucky Hunter Youth Challenge was held May 25-27 at Jabez.  The event entails eight areas including: shotgun, rifle, black powder, rifle, orienteering, animal identification, safety trail and the written test.  Participants of the challenge compete in teams and individually. The two-day competition is sponsored by the NRA for youth organizations to encourage safe hunting practices.  The teams are broken into age groups with junior teams made up of youth ages 9 to 15 and senior groups consisting of ages 15 to 19. 

  • 1812: Dunn buys 100 acres for $200

    200 Years Ago

    James B. Richards was released by the court from his indenture to James Hobbs.   Richards was to learn the hatter’s trade while apprenticed to Hobbs.

    On June 1, 1812, Thomas Moore posted a bond of 50 pounds in order to secure a marriage license to wed Lucy Underwood, daughter of James Underwood.  The marriage was officiated by Henry Brinton, Minister of the Gospel, on June 4, 1812.

  • Long before railroads

    In the farthest eastern point of the county, the quiet town of Gest overlooks the Kentucky River at Lock No. 3.

    Like many towns along the Kentucky River, big plans were made for Gest with a plat layout that included a town park, two school lots, a place for the common market and land plots of more than 50 blocks of real estate.

    In an article by one of the pioneering families of Gest, Cordie Coppersmith wrote that Gest had two saloons, two groceries, a hotel, a barbershop and a ferry that took residents across the river.

  • Never-say-die Cats rally in the sixth, but fall 11-8 to North Oldham

    It was a game that looked to be all but over, just four innings in.

    The “never say die” Henry County Wildcats found themselves down 8-0 after four innings and had yet to shut down the mighty North Oldham hitting machine even for an inning in the second round of the 8th Region baseball tournament.

    But the Cats held the Mustangs scoreless in the fifth and then put their rally caps on and made a game of it in the top of the sixth.

  • The greenhorn comes full circle

    Twenty-eight years ago a brash, slightly cocky and very green young man started his career in coaching and teaching at Eminence High School.

  • Sports brief

    Lady Cats Basketball Shoot for the Stars Basketball Camp

    The Henry County Lady Cats basketball team will host their annual basketball camp June 11-14. Doors open at 8 a.m. Grades 2 through 8 are eligible to participate. There is a $40 fee per camper or $30 for sisters of the same family. Campers receive a t-shirt, free snack each day, speakers and instruction in basketball fundamentals.

    Vaughn Named 8th Region Player of the Year

  • Shop local and support your community

     

     

    Last week, New Castle attorney, and preservationist, Joe Yates told us “Human beings need community. Small towns and neighborhoods in a big city provide a sense of that community.

  • Eminence Middle School AR contest