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Today's News

  • Gomez-Crask

    Moises and Maricela Gomez of Brownsville, Texas,  announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage  of their daughter, Marlene Serrata Gomez, to Major Shane Alvin Crask, son of Garnett and Marcia Crask of Athens, Alabama.

    The groom-elect  is the grandson of Nell Kelley Thomas of Pleasureville and the late Cash R. Thomas. Major Crask is a 1997 graduate of the University of Alabama, where he earned a Bachelor of Science in Nursing.  He is currently serving in the United States Army at Fort Polk, Louisiana. 

  • Singleton

    Darrell and Linda Combs of Waddy announce the marriage of their daughter, Trini Hernandez to Jarrod Singleton of Smithfield, son of David and Karen Wilson and Marshall and Kim Singleton. The couple was united in marriage at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 11, 2012, at Graefenburg United Methodist Church in Frankfort. Andrew Haire, Minister officiated the ceremony.

    The bride was given in marriage by her father, Darrell Combs. Matron of Honor was Luis Hernandez, brother of the bride. Flower girl was Sara Shearer, cousin of the groom.

  • January has a lot to offer for 4-H

    There are lots of fun activities beginning in 4-H during the month of January.  Please read all of them below, so as not to miss out.

  • Looking for treasure in all the right places

    With holiday bills mounting, many of us wish we could find money we lost, forgot about or didn’t know we had. Finding lost valuables, such as insurance policies and unclaimed money or property is easier than you might think.

  • Public will not get milked by hefty dairy prices

    By DAVE TAYLOR
    Landmark News Service
    The potential hefty price rise predicted recently for milk will not occur anytime soon, according to local and statewide dairy leaders.
    The average gallon of milk costs about $3, according to the United States Department of Agriculture. Recently, national media outlets had predicted a fear of prices as high as $7 per gallon due to issues related to a farm bill that was tied into the “Fiscal Cliff” in Washington.

  • Become one with God through Bible reading

    When I was growing up, church offering envelopes had check-off boxes.  One of them was “Daily Bible Reading.”  My generation was encouraged to do it all: check all the boxes, and score 100 percent for the week.
    I was  normally a 100 percent guy each week.  I may have struggled with some of those boxes, but I got the Bible reading done. Though I confess that on some days I was so busy that the best I could do was a hurried glance, a fast read... but better fast than not at all, right?

  • Life is a cherry bowl

    Woodworking keeps Neal Morris alive and he refuses to sit still.

    The numerous finished woodworking products speak to his mastery as a craftsman, but witnessing his process reveals Morris’ is a true Renaissance man.

  • KSP RAIDs drivers

     For Trooper BradArterburn, public affairs officer for Post 5, lowering traffic fatalities doesn’t mean writing more traffic tickets but raising awareness about dangerous driving habits.

    Kentucky State Police started a campaign for removing distracted, impaired and aggressive drivers in November. The Operation RAID — Remove Aggressive, Impaired and Distracted drivers — strategy combines compiled local crash data with an increased law enforcement presence.

  • Faith and hope were Lost Boy’s tools

    The Rev. John Ater told Henry County Middle School students faith and hope proved his greatest survival tools as a ‘Lost Boy’ of Sudan.

    HCMS students recently read A Long Walk to Water, by Linda Sue Park, which gives two narratives, 23 years apart, following the lives of two youths that face adversity due to political unrest and a lack of natural resources.

    Ater came to the states at 20. He recalled vividly how Sudanese rebels killed young boys as a measure of wiping out their future enemy.

  • New Cafe could be Espressoly for You

    Jennifer Cook wanted a business both teenagers and adults could enjoy in her hometown, New Castle.

    The obstacles of updating an older building with modern health and plumbing codes commonly scare new business owners away, but Cook hopes to change that.

    “I grew up in Henry County and as a teen we constantly wanted somewhere to hang out,” Cook said. “We hung out on Bardstown Road and I thought a coffee shop would be a simple idea.”