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Today's News

  • Prison population poses problems

    One of the most challenging problems facing state government these days is our sky-rocketing prison population.

    This decade alone, the number of inmates has risen nearly 50 percent, while costs have gone up by more than half.  In the last fiscal year, we spent $450 million to house more than 21,000 prisoners, a population roughly the same size as our 17th largest city.

    In January, the legislature’s Program Review and Investigations Committee began taking a closer look at the reasons behind this surge.

  • Jesus was a liberal

    Jesus did not ask the blind man or the leper, “give me your silver pieces and THEN I will heal you.”  Health care in this country is bought and sold at the marketplace for profit like any other private consumption good at the expense of human lives. Yet, we claim to be a Christian nation.  122 people die each day in the US due to lack of access to health care; that number is far greater than those who died on 911 and the death toll continues to rise. Where is the memorial to these fellow Americans?

  • Gaines gets unique opportunity in D.C.

    General Manager

    It was a trip he might not have taken without some help from his community.

    In October, Sulphur teen Kenneth Gaines took part in the National Youth Leadership Congress in Washington, D.C. It was the experience of a lifetime.

    While at the conference, Gaines took part in a variety of scenarios. In two of those, Gaines played the part of key leaders — the chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and the U.S. Secretary of Defense.

  • A season to be proud of

    When the Wildcats took the field at Central High School in the quarterfinals of the Class 3-A state playoffs, the Henry County football program looked destined to do what no football team at HCHS has ever done before.

  • Trying terrorists in NYC is a mistake

    The White House says it has good reasons to bring the terrorists who planned the 9/11 attacks to New York City to try them in a federal courtroom instead of at the secure detention facility at Guantanamo. But I can’t think of any.

    The reasons why that decision is a mistake, however, are easy to list. It puts the tools we use to fight terror at risk. And it is a needless risk to America’s security. And it gives these terrorists a worldwide platform to spread their hateful propaganda.

  • Better safe than sorry

    Staff writer/photographer

    Emergency responders played it safe last week as they responded to a call at Hussey Copper in Eminence.

    A 911 call received by Shelby County dispatchers last Thursday night at 10 p.m. was placed from a cell phone, but operators quickly realized it came from inside the Hussey Copper facility in Eminence.

    Henry County Emergency Management Director Bruce Owens said the call was directed to Shelby County because it was the closest 911 to the cell phone’s location.

  • Students get a crash course in texting

    Staff writer/photographer

    A 16-year old male driver was typing a text message into his phone when he almost rear-ended a motorcycle, veered off the right side of the road then hit a deer.

    A 16-year old girl fared little better, repeatedly crossing the center line on a two-lane road while typing her name into her phone’s keypad.

    “She was pretty much over the center line all the time,” said James Gray of the Kentucky Office of Highway Safety.

  • Reflections on the giving of thanks

    Dennis Prager, a well-known author and radio talk-show host, has written that gratitude is the key to happiness. Here is how he has put it:

    “There is a ‘secret to happiness’ and it is gratitude. All happy people are grateful, and ungrateful people cannot be happy. We tend to think that it is being unhappy that leads people to complain, but it is truer to say that it is complaining that leads to people becoming unhappy. Become grateful and you will become a much happier person.”

  • Eminence to host 24-hour race in 2010

    The Highland Renaissance site in Eminence will host a 24-hour footrace on March 13-14, which will be the first race in Henry County longer than the typical 3.1 miles.

  • The 2010 political season is underway

    The local political season has started. To inform the interested, it is time for those who want to be active in their local, state or federal government to enter the system by applying for a position from now until Jan. 26 at 4 p.m. Either join us at our meetings or go to the Henry County Clerks Office for the forms and information to join the process.