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Today's News

  • Public Record for the week of Feb.13

    Marriages

    Denise Needham, 36, Lockport to Bobby Westrick, 35, Lockport.

    Divorces

    Richard Wilson II, 65, La Grange, and Diane Sola, 61, Smithfield

    Timothy Henderson, 33, Pleasureville, and Crystal Jennings, 32, Bethlehem

    Timothy Hahn, 41, Campbellsburg, and Danielle Hahn, 35, Campbellsburg

    Steve Spencer, 49, Georgetown, Kathleen Winters, 37, Pleasureville

  • God, the flag and our money

    Michael Duncan

    I confess to having some “bad” thoughts. Facebook is the cause. I don’t spend a lot of time on Facebook. Mostly I scan through some time during the day to see if any of my friends have posted anything interesting.

    There are some interesting things on Facebook, including some photos I had rather not seen.  But more often than not, it is the comments that friends post that bother me.

  • The House wasted no time moving ahead

    Under the rules that govern odd-year legislative sessions, much of the General Assembly’s work doesn’t begin until February and it ends about a week before the start of March Madness.  With four days set aside in January for organizational matters and one or two days in late March used to consider any vetoes, that leaves about 25 days to cover what is often a long agenda.

  • Tractor-trailer accident destroys vehicle leaves driver only bruised

    A tractor-trailer came over the hill on Mulberry Pike Monday carrying a load of flat-rolled steel from Steel Technologies near the Eminence Cemetery. The driver, Harold Devine of Eminence said a gust of wind pushed his tractor-trailer just enough to be in the ditch causing him to lose control of the vehicle. Eminence Police and Eminence Fire Department responded. Devine suffered bruises from a seat belt strap and sustained no serious injuries. The National Weather Service had issued a weather advisory for gusts of wind in the area that could reach up to 30 mph.

  • USPS proposes cutting Saturday mail

    The United States Postal Service has proposed eliminating Saturday letter delivery in an unprecedented effort to keep itself afloat and save $2 billion annually.

    USPS Board of Governors advised postal management last month to implement cost-cutting measures in order to avoid the further hemorrhaging of its finances.

  • State committee approves hemp bill

    The Kentucky Senate Agriculture Committee didn’t blow any smoke when it came to setting the industrial hemp bill on fire with unanimous support Monday.

    The bill would regulate Kentucky’s industrial hemp crops under the supervision of the state Department of Agriculture.

    Committee chair Sen. Paul Hornback, R-Shelbyville, sponsored the bill, which would require that farmers who want to grow the crop undergo criminal background checks before the department would issue their annual license.

  • Helping HANDS

    Megan Fleming was nervous when she found out she was pregnant.

    She went into preterm labor twice. Fleming found comfort with the help of the HANDS program.

    Fleming had her son, Elijah Downey, at 18. Fleming found out about the HANDS program before he was born and doesn’t regret signing up.

  • Lindsay inspired others

    John Lindsay didn’t want to go to Lincoln Institute during the early years of integration.

    Lindsay’s decision gave family members and former classmates from the Merriweather and King Street schools the confidence to attend the previously all white school-Eminence High School.

  • Sulphur’s demise was closely tied to automobiles

    The expansion of the railroad stopped progress in the river towns like Lockport and Gestville where goods, supplies and passengers relied on the steamboat.

    Similarly, the automobile would stop progress in towns like Sulphur.

    Sulphur has had as many names as it has changes to its hilly rural landscape.

  • Eminence Reading Buddies

    For 30 minutes each Friday, buddies at Eminence Elementary and Middle Schools get together and enjoy a good book.

    The Reading Buddies program began at Eminence Independent Schools eight years ago, the expression of an idea that started on an Arby’s napkin.

    Language Arts teacher Jennifer Montgomery and librarian Penny Bland were working on their National Board Certification, thinking of projects they could collaborate on.

    For seven or eight weeks, first grade students and eighth grade students meet in the school’s library.