Today's News

  • Something old is something new

    As you flip through the pages of your Local today, you might notice a few things that are, well, different.

    The first is immediately opposite of this page — Local Buzz.

    The Local staff decided a few months ago that our community calender, or bulletin board, could use a change.

    We wanted to add a few things and remove a couple things, and present them in a more eye catching way.

    Cindy DiFazio and Tawnja Morris came up with the name —Local Buzz, and the rest is history.

  • Collins School opened in August 1909

    Part 1 of a series
    submitted By Eleanor Jones Sharp

    An amazing story begins with a scene which makes us proud of our heritage in a lifestyle that behooves us to hold onto a part of our past. To instill the view seen in these portrait prints and to recall many stories I have written in my journal does evoke images of bygone days. The pages on time spent in the days of our youth will scan and record an epitaph upon our life’s journey.

  • Plan today for a better 2011 in ag

    In his poem entitled ‘February 2, 1968’, Wendell Berry wrote:
    In the dark of the moon, in flying snow, in the dead of winter,
    war spreading, families dying, the world in danger,

    I walk the rocky hillside, sowing clover.

  • Extension Office celebrates eight decades of service

    On Sunday, Jan. 23, the Henry County Extension Council hosted a celebration at Twin Oaks in New Castle to celebrate extension memories dating as far back as 1925.

  • ‘The most segregated day of the week’

    The same tableau played out in sanctuaries across America in the 1950s no matter the ethnicity of parishioners, but there were differences.

    Whites worshipped with whites and blacks with blacks.

    “Even today the most segregated day of the week is Sunday,” Joyce Winburn said.

    All the young girls in church congregations all over the U.S. sat primly with ankles crossed. They wore carefully pressed dresses and dainty white gloves.

  • EIS board approves Phase 1

    At a special meeting of the Eminence Independent Schools board, steps were finalized to implement Phase 1 of the district’s master building plan.
    EIS will spend around $274,000 this year.

    The gymnasium will get a total update with new floor and paint.

    In school hallways and corridors, carpet installed 18 months ago will be ripped out and replaced with sheet flooring in the elementary school and tile in the middle and high school. “The carpet just didn’t work,” Superintendent Buddy Berry said.

  • Who was Myra Shelden?

    Less than a month ago, Henry County Sheriff’s Detective Danny Stivers found Myra Shelden near the back door of her home, the apparent victim of hypothermia.

    The home had but one source of heat — a small ceramic heater. Officials indicated the home was in bad condition. All that was known, at the time, was that Shelden had an aunt in Ohio — a fact they found thanks to a Christmas card in her purse — who would link them with Shelden’s adoptive mother in New Albany, Ind.

  • Lockport man indicted for November burglary; assault

    A Lockport man charged with breaking into an ex-girlfriend’s home and assaulting the woman and her friend — twice in one night — has been indicted.

    Douglas Clay Moore, 45, was indicted for 1st degree burglary, 2nd degree burglary and two counts of 4th degree assault.

  • Schools extend calendars, schedule make up days

    The Henry County Board of Education recently voted to amend the 2010-11 calendar because of snow days.
    It was decided that school will be in session on Presidents’ Day, Monday, Feb. 21.

    “If we have no more closed days, our last day is now June 3,” Superintendent Tim Abrams said, “and each additional day off will add to the end of the year. If something catastrophic happens we’ll have to look at spring break.”

  • “College and Career: Do you and your student have a plan? “

    Parents are invited to come to  the HCHS auditorium on Feb. 10, to learn how you can help your student get accepted to college, qualify for scholarships and be career ready by graduation. Jim Masters, HCHS principal, and guidance counselors will give you information on what ACT scores mean to you and your student and discuss what scores are needed for college acceptance and for academic scholarships. The school also will be introducing our new program, ePrep, and how HCHS and parents can use the program to improve ACT scores.