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Today's News

  • Points are right, approach was wrong

    It was clear from the beginning of last week’s Pleasureville City Commission meeting that there was tension.
    At one point, the “discussion” truly had the feel of a spat between sisters, more than a reasoned and rational commission meeting.

  • Eminence resident thankful for Christmas miracle

    Pulmonary fibrosis.

    The diagnosis three years ago was tantamount to a death sentence for Bonnie Kidwell of Eminence.
    For some time, Kidwell, now 57, had had problems breathing. When the situation worsened, she was treated for pneumonia. When that treatment failed to work, she was hospitalized. The doctors still believed she was fighting pneumonia, but after a week with no improvement, the tests began.

  • Bethlehem nativity set for next week

    For many area residents, it just isn’t Christmas without a visit to the living nativity scene in Bethlehem.
    The event, which has been held every year since 1959, is sponsored by the tiny city’s three churches – Bethlehem Baptist, Bethlehem United Methodist and Point Pleasant Christian.

  • 'UNBELIEVABLE, DEPLORABLE CONDITIONS'

    Henry County Animal Control officials on Monday, Dec. 12, seized more than 100 dogs and as many as 100 other animals from buildings on a property located at 25 Allison Lane in rural Campbellsburg.

    The animals were being kept in crates and cages in a single-wide trailer, a camper, outdoor kennels and a large outbuilding.

    The stench emanating from the property could be detected from the road.

  • Public record for the week of Dec. 7

    Marriages

  • How 4-H and civic engagement go together

    The skills taught throughout 4-H prepare youth for community involvement, with the idea that good leaders give back to their community in a variety ways.

    Community service, through 4-H involves service learning in which youth learn a skill or skills and apply it to a service project. This traditional approach to service applies to clubs at the county level, and for some youth, can lead to the national conference and/or the 4-H Congress.

  • KY farm cash receipts exceed $5B

    The big news out of the Kentucky Farm Bureau meeting last week is that farm cash receipts are likely to exceed $5 billion for the first time, up from $4.4 billion in 2010.  With improvement in returns in corn, soybeans, wheat, cattle, horses, hogs and dairy, net farm income is expected to rebound back above $1 billion in 2011, compared to $780 million in 2010.

  • KY farm cash receipts exceed $5B

    The big news out of the Kentucky Farm Bureau meeting last week is that farm cash receipts are likely to exceed $5 billion for the first time, up from $4.4 billion in 2010.  With improvement in returns in corn, soybeans, wheat, cattle, horses, hogs and dairy, net farm income is expected to rebound back above $1 billion in 2011, compared to $780 million in 2010.

  • 1861: W.W. Clubb reimbursed for $29.40 in food, cloth and more

    175 Years Ago

    In the early years of Kentucky, when fences were very rare, it was legal to “take up” and care for stray farm animals.  The finder reported the stray to the sheriff who listed the animal along with a description in the stray book.  If an owner was not found for the animal the finder could keep it.  If the owner was found he could pay the finder for keeping the animal and take it back. 

  • 1861: W.W. Clubb reimbursed for $29.40 in food, cloth and more

    175 Years Ago

    In the early years of Kentucky, when fences were very rare, it was legal to “take up” and care for stray farm animals.  The finder reported the stray to the sheriff who listed the animal along with a description in the stray book.  If an owner was not found for the animal the finder could keep it.  If the owner was found he could pay the finder for keeping the animal and take it back.