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Today's News

  • Contractor working to meet July 1 shelter deadline

    Tony Walker is a man under pressure.

    The Bedford resident, who owns TW Concrete, was hired by Trimble County Fiscal Court in January to build a new animal shelter, which will be shared by Trimble and Henry counties. His deadline of July 1 is coming up fast.

    Walker said concrete and masonry contracts were approved during a special Fiscal Court meeting Friday, March 2. At the end of the meeting, the plan was to begin “moving dirt” to prepare the site, located across the road from Valley View Landfill, on Monday, March 5.

  • Local Buzz for the week of March 21

    Arts & Crafts

    Free adult scrapbooking offered at the Eminence Community Life Center from 10 a.m. to noon, on Thursdays.

    Church Services

    Hymn sing at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 24 at Grubridge Community Church featuring Heaven Bound with Donna Parker and Lisa Agee.

  • HCPS lunch to cost 10 cents more in 2012-13

    Lunch prices in Henry County Public Schools will increase by 10-cents for the 2012-13 school year.

    Food services director Sidney Rothenberger told members of the HCPS Board of Education Monday night that she didn’t want to implement the increase, but that it was part of a federal mandate.

    That mandate was part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.

  • Bandwidth too low for C’Burg WiFi

    Bandwidth – or, rather, the lack of it – is the root of what’s ailing the free wireless Internet system being provided by the City of Campbellsburg.

    That was the diagnosis given Monday to City Council by Brent Graves of PoweredOn in Carrollton, who was hired more than a year ago to set up the system meant to provide city residents with free wireless Internet access.

  • Terri Smith enters guilty plea

    During a pretrial hearing Monday in Henry County Circuit Court, Terri L. Smith, 51, of Campbellsburg, waived her right to a jury trial and entered a guilty plea to one count of second-degree cruelty to animals, a Class A misdemeanor.

  • Public record for the week of March 14

    Marriages

    • Elisa M. Mathis, 38, Eminence, to Melvin P. Rader, 43, Eminence.
    • Cindy Ann Emerson, 53, Turners Station, to Timothy Lee Emerson, 49, Turners Station.
    • Jessica Brooke Southworth, 33, New Castle, to Damon Dale Turner, 33, New Castle.

    Property Transfers

  • Warriors face, overcome obstacles

    An anonymous quote declares that “adversity doesn’t build character, it reveals it.”

    The Eminence High School basketball teams reflected the sentiment this season, as both the boys and the girls faced very different kinds of adversity.

    “It’s just amazing, and our kids learned this lesson, how one negative can impact your whole year,” EHS boys coach Chris Nethery said, declining to specify exactly what that negative was.

  • Frommeyer retiring after 28 years in Eminence district

    It’s no joke: On April 1, Steve Frommeyer will retire as principal at Eminence High School and Middle School.

    In an interview Monday, Frommeyer said the decision to leave the post after 22 years ranks as one of the most difficult decisions of his life.

    The toughest, he said, was the decision to move away from Richmond, Ky., where he had earned a bachelor’s degree and master’s degree at Eastern Kentucky University, and where he met and married his wife, Jenifer.

  • A laptop for every student

    Eminence High School will take a big leap forward, in terms of technology, when students return for the 2012-13 school year.

    Superintendent Buddy Berry said the Board of Education last month approved his “One-to-One” plan, which will assign an Apple MacBook laptop computer to every student in grades nine through 12 next year. The students will have access to their computers 24 hours a day, seven days a week to use in class during instruction and at home for projects or to conduct online research.

  • Students probe cell phone use in school

    Technology in the classroom can be a double-edged sword. It obviously has its merits, as the number of ways to use computers in schools has increased exponentially in just a few short years.

    But it also can be distracting. More and more students have their own cell phones, and most of these devices can do so much more than just allow phone calls. Games, music and Internet access anytime, anywhere, can prove to be too tempting for students to ignore.