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Today's News

  • Student of the Week: New Castle Elementary School Mallory Denny

    astle Elementary.

    What is your favorite subject?
    Math. I like to do multiplication, division, subtraction  and addition. You learn new ways to do things.

    What do you want to do when you grow up?
    I can’t decide. I would like to be a veterinarian and help pets or be a teacher and help kids learn

    Do you have any pets?
    I have a hyper chocolate lab named Rowdy.

    What do you do for fun?
    I like to play outside sometimes I jump on the trampoline or swing on the swing set.

  • Act on Diabetes Now

  • Denver Alexander Souix Corchado


    Stephanie Miles Ucan and Marcos Corchado-Castaneda of Carrollton announce the  birth of their son, Denver Alexander Souix Corchado, born, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, at Norton Hospital in Louisville. He weighed 8 pounds, 15 ounces, and was 20.5 inches long.
    Marcos Alejandro Corchado 20, of Torreon, Mexico, helped welcome his little brother home.
    Maternal grandparents are  Phyllis and Larry Sculley of Port Royal and Tommy and Denise Miles of Owenton. Maternal great grandparents are James Dempsey of Carrollton, and Irene Duncan of Amelia, Ohio.

  • Cram the Cruiser

    Kentucky State Police are conducting the third annual Cram the Cruiser food drive for needy families in the area. The drive runs until Dec. 14. Non perishable food items may be brought to any KSP post location. In 2011, the campaign netted 50,931 pounds of food statewide.

  • Stivers attended Nationals for National American Miss Pageant

    Kelcey Stivers placed in the top 10 state finalists out of 120 girls at the pageant this summer.
    The National Pageant conducted in Anaheim, Calif., at Disneyland during Thanksgiving week. She represented Texas and had the opportunity to win her share of over $500,000 in cash and prizes.

  • HC Cattlement meet, elect new board

    Cattleman of the Year

    Roberts Angus Farms, Ryan Roberts, Owner/Operator,  of Bethlehem was recognized as the recipient of the 2012 Henry County Cattleman of the Year during ceremonies Monday night at the Cattleman’s Annual Meeting at the Henry County Extension Office.  Seated is Linda McAlister Roberts. Pictured above, right, standing, from left to right, are Tom McAlister, Ryan P. Roberts, Howard Lee Byers, Dorothy McAlister, Randy McAlister, and Janice Byers.

  • Kitchen mysteries: Is it better to tear or cut lettuce?

    Is it better to tear lettuce leaves or cut them?

    Most salad lovers will tell you that a torn leaf lasts longer, while a cut lettuce leaf turns brown faster.

    The rationale behind this is that, when torn, the leaf breaks along the natural boundaries between cells, whereas a knife cuts right through cells causing more damage and quicker browning.

    Despite this theory, however, there appears to be no real difference in browning between a cut leaf and a torn one. So, whether salad greens are cut or torn are of personal preference.

  • Public Record for the week of Nov. 28

    Marriages

    Suzanne Elizabeth Ochoa, 45, to Lawrence Richard Yates, 47, Eminence.

    Jerusha Nicole Fitzgerald, 38, Eminence, to Robert Ralph Trask, 43, Eminence.

    Zoning permits

    Robert Cook, 346 Scobie Lane, New Castle, 10/1, house,  fee $122, value $20,000.

    Thoms Collette, 532 Bart Smith Road, Smithfield, 10/1, accessory building, fee $121, fee $6,000.

  • Dream wranglin'

    Cowboy Leslie Fender doesn’t wrangle cattle. He’s wrangling a childhood dream.

    Residents traveling through Eminence last week on Wednesday morning might have caught a glimpse of Fender’s quarter horse Angel untied, patiently waiting in a parking space for Fender to finish his breakfast. The scene of a horse outfitted with saddlebags parked next to an El Camino made for quite a juxtaposition.

  • Hunting with heart

    Robbie Aldridge hunts for his family, not for sport.

    Deep in the hills and hollers, along the tributary commonly known as Six Mile Creek, Aldridge hunts on his family’s 52-acre farm.

    Dawn barely touches landmarks known to Aldridge’s family like Fool’s Holler and the site of the Salem schoolhouse, a location marked only by a well. Aldridge can trace his family roots back 200 years in the area where he hunts.