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Today's News

  • Wildcat Track Teams Wins Carroll Co. Invitational

    After having their own meet cancelled by bad weather, the Henry County track team went to the Carroll County Invitational and came away with first place finishes in the girls and boys competitions.

    The girls’ team won a squeaker over Owen County with 58 points to the Lady Rebels’ 56 points. Bellevue was third with 46 points and Carroll County finished fourth with 17 points.

    The boys finished with 65 points, Owen County was second with 58 points, while Bellevue finished with 18 points and Carroll County finished with 11 points.

  • 4-H Shooting Club hosts meet

    The Henry County sharpshooters held a region-wide competition on Saturday at the Steel Tech shooting range outside of Eminence. The shooting competition included rifle, shot gun, pistol and archery divisions.

    John David Yount, a coach and volunteer for the group, marveled at how the Henry County shooting team had grown.

    “We had five kids when we started,” he said. “We had to take them everywhere. They couldn’t miss a competition because you need five to score. Now look at all these kids out here.”

  • Sports Briefs-Cheerleaders named to All-State Team

    Cornerstone Christian Church cheerleaders Kelley Berry, left, and Callie Rose were named to the Kentucky Christian Athletic Association All-State Team after the state competition. Berry is the daughter of Ed and Tish Berry, and Callie is the daughter of Ginger Gault and Chris Rose.

  • Sports Brief-Middle School Soccer Underway

    Submitted

    The Henry County Middle School boys’ soccer team played Carroll County on April 8.

    In the first half Carroll County took a 1-0 lead, then Aneszko tied the game. Carroll scored again to lead 2-1 at the half.

    In the second half Carroll added another goal to make it 3-1 before Devon Shaw scored to bring it to 3-2.

    Henry County had several shots on goal but could not get another goal.

  • One part quixotic and one part humor

    By Joe Yates

    I don’t have the time to do this, but I have to.  That’s what kept going through my mind as I was debating whether to commit to the challenge of a regular newspaper column. For aspiring writers of any age, an opportunity like this is exciting as well as intimidating.

  • Increase fruit and veggies in diet

    We all know that we should eat at least five servings of fruits and vegetables a day, but many of us don’t get the recommended servings.

    Fruits and vegetables are important to our diet, because they provide necessary nutrients and are high in dietary fiber and low in calories, fat and cholesterol. The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend that you make half your plate fruits and vegetables.

  • Sharpshooters show at challenge

    Henry County Sharpshooters Attend Youth Hunter Education Challenge

  • Poisonous plants in pasture & fields

    Cattleman’s Meeting

    The Henry County Cattleman’s Association announces its April meeting 6:30 p.m. Monday, April 22, at the Henry County Extension Office. As always, a great program of industry news is being planned. On the program will be a veterinarian report, along with FFA, Extension, FSA, and an update on Phase One tobacco funds, along with a sponsor report. The sponsored meal will feature beef products. Contact the Extension Office at 845-2811 by 4:00 pm Friday to reserve your spot.

     

  • Public Record for the week of April 17

    Marriages

    Cristal Rutherford, 42, Eminence to Tracey Brock, 40, Eminence.

    Angie Puckett, 44, Pleasureville, to Gregory Elrod, 48, Pleasureville.

    Amanda Cisneros, 24, Campbellsburg, to Thomas Dehart, 26, Campbellsburg.

    Lorilee S. Parrish, 45, Crestwood, to Troy Jones, 48, Crestwood.

     

    Property Transfers

  • New food trends mean opportunity

    By Lance Minnis

     

    Recent years have seen new trends in America’s foodways.

    The growth of Farmer’s Markets, CSAs, and restaurants that serve locally sourced food show that consumers are hungry for fresher, healthier options where they feel a relationship to the grower and the land, and where they have some say over what’s put in their bodies.

    Many things have fed into this trend, most notably environmental issues and the increased awareness of the health dangers of processed foods from factories and mills.