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Today's News

  • Popular teacher taking a one year leave

    Staff writer/photographer

    Eminence High School’s Intelligent Classroom software was on the fritz that Friday, so popular high school math teacher Buddy Berry improvised.

    He lit birthday candles and stuck them into hamburger buns. Students armed with water pistols attempted, mostly in vain, to put out the flames amidst bursts of laughter. It was harder than it looked and most of the candles still flickered atop soggy bread.

    He was teaching a lesson in probabilities.

  • Henry County native graduates from West Point

    General Manager

    Justin Bramlage remembers bouncing a racquetball against a wall while talking to his mother.

    “I said if I feel like this Monday morning, I’m ... getting the paperwork to quit,” Justin said. He was in his plebe year at the  United States Military Academy at West Point, the year his mother Ruth describes as the pressure cooker year. He told his mother there was a 99.9 percent chance he was quitting.

  • Design a plan to become the biggest loser

    Anyone who tells you that losing weight will be easy has never tried but here are some techniques used by individuals who have been successful at weight loss.

    1.  Set a reasonable goal:  The first goal of weight control may be to simply prevent further weight gain! The first goal of weight loss should be to reduce your starting body weight by about 10 percent.  If your starting weight is 250 pounds then a reasonable goal would be to lose 25 pounds over a 12 week period. 

  • Government aid penalizes successful companies

    The government has seen fit to subsidize two automobile manufacturers with billions of dollars of our (and our children’s) tax money. If one is the recipient of “free” money from the government I’m sure there is reason to celebrate, but what of those who are not receiving government largesse?

  • Hinkel, Mings named HCHS top athletes

    Cody Hinkel and Kelsey Mings were given the trophies for the top athletes at Henry County High School during Honors Night last month, officially joining a long list that includes some of the best athletes that have walked the halls at HCHS.

  • HCHS grad presented paper to conference in Wales

    Staff writer/photographer

    Ashley Ireland’s groundbreaking research into the high-tech “Google Generation’s” information gathering methods earned her a trip abroad.

    This spring, the 2001 Henry County High School graduate was invited to present her findings at the Literacy Annual Conference in Cardiff, Wales.

    “There was a lot of publicity calling this college-age generation lazy,” she said, “and unable to think critically.”

  • Hamilton: ‘I am going to walk’

    Staff writer/photographer

    Betty Jean Payton Hamilton was in Eminence running routine errands on May 21 when she suffered a life-altering accident.

    The 76-year old New Castle resident had been to the bank and the grocery store, and stopped in at the pawn shop to chat with relatives.

    Hamilton then went to Southern States where she was going to grab some gardening plants.

  • Community is welcome to Music on Main

    Music on Main is this Friday night. The City of Eminence wants to invite everyone to attend. This is a night full of fellowship, food, fun and live music. The live music will be provided by another local band, the Sugarfoot Band! The night will start at 5:30 with a great selection of food — Eminence Christian Church will have a fish fry and Wesley Morrison will have some Hot Diggity Dawgs! The live band will take the stage at 7, and will play until 11. There will also be some fun for the kids.

  • Shortfall will be focus of legislative session

    When the drafters of Kentucky’s constitution wrote the section on special legislative sessions more than a century ago, they gave the governor the authority to call them and set the agenda, but left it up to the General Assembly to decide what, if anything, should become law.

    With that in mind, Governor Beshear last week formally called legislators to return to Frankfort on June 15.  Not surprisingly, his first priority is overcoming a billion-dollar shortfall for the upcoming fiscal year, which begins in July.

  • Pleasureville needs a new fire truck

    In the past the City of Pleasureville has had no luck in retaining a police officer. They complain there is not enough “action” in Pleasureville. Since the city cannot afford to pay overtime, an officer would only be allowed to work 40 hours.  That leaves 128-hours per week the town is not covered.  We have more protection day and night when we don’t have an officer; through the Kentucky State Police and the Henry County Sheriff’s Office.  There are only three women at our Commission meetings that complain of not having an officer.