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Today's News

  • Smithfield Baptist Church is razed

    Staff writer/photographer

    For 137 years, the oldest portion of Smithfield Baptist Church stood tall. It stands no more.

    Reverend Ed Life said the old building finally had to come down.

    The sign outside the church reads “Thank you, Lord, for 137 years in this building.”

  • Community Calendar for the week of May 20, 2009

    Wednesday, May 20

     

    Karate classes will be held at the Community Center from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

     

    Children’s Story and Craft hour every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. at Pleasureville Christian Church. Also, the community library at the church is open to the public from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesdays.

     

    Thursday, May 21

     

  • Three EHS, two HCHS students named as Governors Scholars

    Staff writer/photographer

    Five students in Henry County have been selected to participate in the 2009 Governors Scholars Program.

    Three Eminence High School juniors and two from Henry County High School (plus an alternate) recently were chosen for the program.

    EHS students Keisha Jamison and Rachel Sims look forward to participating in the project following a difficult application process.

  • The benefits of exercise

    This summer, I am encouraging Fourth District residents to join me in exercising more often.  As you may know, obesity can cause numerous complications to your health.  In Kentucky, more than twenty-seven percent of the population is obese.  However, by becoming more physically active, we can reverse this dangerous trend and put ourselves on the right track to a healthier future.  

  • Community Calendar for the week of May 6, 2009

    Wednesday, May 6

    Karate classes will be held at the Community Center from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

    Children’s Story and Craft hour every Wednesday from 10 to 11 a.m. at Pleasureville Christian Church. Also, the community library at the church is open to the public from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Wednesdays.

    The HCMS Site Based Council meeting will be held in the middle school conference room at 4 p.m.

    Eastern Elementary SBDM council will meet at 4 p.m. in the school library.

  • Stuck in line? Not for long

    General Manager

    Motorists sitting in long lines on U.S. 421 soon will see some relief.

    Thanks to a set of perfect circumstances, turn lanes will be installed in front of the schools.

    Construction on two turn lanes — one into each entrance to the schools — is slated for this summer.

    Henry County Public Schools Superintendent Tim Abrams said he was excited about the project, which is something the district has sought for several years.

  • Census Bureau reports moving rate at lowest in 60 years

    In any given year, a little more than 10 percent of our country’s population packs up its belongings and moves.  Most don’t go far: Two-thirds just re-locate to another area in the same county, and another fifth stay in the same state.

    In today’s economy, however, even our restless nature is taking a break.  The U.S. Census Bureau confirmed that last month, when it reported our country’s moving rate in 2008 was the lowest since the agency began tracking it in 1948.

  • Stone could be released June 1

    General Manager

    An Eminence man charged with murder soon may be released from jail.

    Warren Stone, 56, was in Henry County District Court Monday for Judge Diana E. Wheeler’s ruling on his competency. But that ruling did not come, and Wheeler continued the case to June 1.

    Stone is charged with the Feb. 29, 2008, murder of his mother, Maralyn Stone Burchett.

  • AFJROTC provides discipline, caring

    Staff writer/photographer

    Dressed in sweaty t-shirts and gym shorts, JROTC leaders Lt. Col. Mark Fassio and MSgt. Kevin (Sarge) McClure sprawled comfortably on office chairs.

    Veterans of both the military and teaching high school, they had just finished playing a game of basketball with their considerably younger counterparts, the cadets.

  • National energy tax legislation will cause more pain for Kentucky families

    Over the next few weeks, the House of Representatives will dedicate significant energy to debating a proposal that will increase utility bills, raise the price of a gallon of gas, push food prices to new heights and generally increase the cost of nearly every consumer product in an attempt to hastily address the issue of global climate change.