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Today's News

  • Pleasureville needs a new fire truck

    In the past the City of Pleasureville has had no luck in retaining a police officer. They complain there is not enough “action” in Pleasureville. Since the city cannot afford to pay overtime, an officer would only be allowed to work 40 hours.  That leaves 128-hours per week the town is not covered.  We have more protection day and night when we don’t have an officer; through the Kentucky State Police and the Henry County Sheriff’s Office.  There are only three women at our Commission meetings that complain of not having an officer.

  • Offer a little respect to cemetery worker

    Memorial Day is a day set aside for us as Americans to remember those who have fought and died for our country and I would like to thank all the men and women who have fought and died for our country, and I would like to thank all the men and women who have given the ultimate sacrifice for our country over the years.

  • ATVs create a ruckus in NC

    Staff writer/photographer

    September Tingle and her family’s all-terrain vehicles are the focus of neighborhood grievances in the Castle Creek subdivision south of New Castle.

    In May, a handful of residents came to the New Castle City Commission to air their complaints. At the June meeting, both sides of the argument were represented and packed the meeting room. Tingle said she was unaware the ATVs were considered to be such a problem.

  • Eminence to go with OneCall

    General Manager

    Notifying Eminence residents of special meetings, events or important alerts could become easier after a move by the city council Monday night.

    In a 4-2 vote, the council voted to contract with OneCall Now for a system similar to what the county government and both school districts use to notify residents and parents of emergencies and other situations.

  • Enough with all the rules and regs

    People the world over are governed by rules and regulations – far too many in my humble opinion. The ones that irk me the most are those aimed at protecting us from our own actions – like the mandatory seatbelt law, or, in many states, the mandatory helmet law for motorcyclists. I know, I know – many of these laws save lives. But I believe folks ought to have the right to act unwisely in matters affecting only themselves. The Bill of Rights should have had a clause to the affect that people have the right to be dumb about their own welfare if they choose.

  • Proms should be held at the schools

    I recently saw where the HCHS senior prom and the EHS prom were held in Louisville. My question is why couldn’t the proms be held at their respective high school gyms?

    When I went to school, the high school gym was a suitable place for the senior prom, but it seems the grown ups are sending the seniors the wrong message by saying that the seniors are better than the seniors who came before them like myself.

    I hope everyone will come to their senses and start holding the senior proms at the high school gyms again.

  • Graduate is first in family with diploma

    Staff writer/photographer

    He is the first in his family to graduate from high school, and became a naturalized citizen only last year.

    Brian Dong, of Eminence, emigrated from the Fu Zhou province in China with his parents, Mei Chen and Xiao Dong, in 1997. He was just six years old.

    “We traveled from  place-to-place,” he said. “I went to different schools until I was in fifth grade.”

  • Kentucky well prepared for large scale outbreaks

    While there are still a few reports of the H1N1 (or swine) flu being diagnosed across the state, it is looking more and more likely that our fears of a more serious outbreak will thankfully not come to pass.

    But that, of course, does not mean we need to let our guard down.

    Fortunately, that is even less likely to happen after the recent announcement by the University of Louisville that it has received a $2.3 million federal grant to help communities prepare for any possible large-scale public health outbreaks.

  • Donations are necessary to maintain cemetery

    Recently this nation celebrated Memorial Day, a day set aside to honor those people who served in our military to fight our wars and to protect our families. Some served and returned home to family, others died and were buried on foreign soils because they believed in serving our country to protect the freedoms that their forefathers had fought and won on our behalf. The Gettysburg Address was probably the first public speech to honor those who fought in the civil war.

  • Baptist Hospital Northeast to offer prostate cancer screenings June 13

    Baptist Hospital Northeast will offer prostate screenings for men over age 50 and those at high risk for prostate cancer from 8:30 a.m.-noon, Saturday, June 13, in the Ambulatory Care Center.

    Urologists Brooks Jackson, MD, and Christopher Smith, MD, will perform the digital rectal exams and Baptist Northeast Laboratory personnel will take blood samples to perform the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. There will be a $5 fee to help cover the cost of the blood test.