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Today's News

  • In search of the perfect Christmas treed

    In December of 1970 when our first child was a baby, my husband and I lived in a tiny house overlooking miles of prairie near Auburn, Kansas. Given my fascination with pioneers, I decided that, like Kansans of long ago, we should use a tumbleweed for a Christmas tree. I was excited to relive this tradition, and so we bundled up our baby and hiked onto a pasture in search of a suitable tumbleweed from among the many that piled up on the barbed wire fences along the north side.

  • Moserwood Farm stuck with horses after owner bails

    General Manager

    Cold temperatures and biting wind rarely keep bargain hunters away from a good deal, and Friday morning was no exception at Moserwood Farms near Bethlehem.

    In a first for his administration, Henry County Sheriff Danny Cravens conducted a sheriff’s sale. Up for sale were 10 thoroughbred horses brought to the farm for boarding in 2007. The “cheapest” horse sold for $100, while the most expensive sold for $2,050.

  • AARP hosts driving class for seniors

    Staff writer/photographer

    At 90 years of age, Foster Robinson listened attentively to Kentuckiana Regional Planning and Development Agency Driver Safety instructor, Glenn Woods’ advice on observing your surroundings when you are behind the wheel.

    “You don’t want to develop tunnel vision when you drive,” he said. “You want to keep moving your eyes back and forth.”

  • N.C. students try to make Christmas brighter

    Staff writer/photographer

    There were elves aplenty in Suzanne Cates second grade class last week.

    Cates’ 20 students split into groups of four, cheerfully working on their Giving Back Project  — helping to fill the needs of some local charitable organizations.

  • Need information

    Need information

    I am writing in hopes that someone in the county can help me locate some information.  I am looking for any information on a Charles Dorman Powell.

    He married an Ann Coghill of New Castle in the mid to late 1940s.  I know he had a sister by the name of Barbara and one, maybe two brothers.  I am also looking for any information on a William or Albert Rudd that lived/owned farms on Fallen Timber Road in the 50’s.

  • Get a personal touch with the Christmas Cachet

    Bethlehem Postmaster

    In this fast paced, hurry up and get it done kind of world we live in, you can do just about anything without having to acknowledge another human being. Humor me, if you will, as I demonstrate a typical scenario:

  • Public Record for the week of Oct. 8, 2008

    Marriages

    Brenda Barnes Mertz, 45, Eminence, to Kenneth Ray Ingram, 38, Eminence.

    Lynetta C. Bohannon, 36, Turners Station, to Timothy O. Eddlemann, 45, Louisville.

    Divorces

    Johnnie W. Janes, 45, Chaplin, and Wanda Mae Brown, 59, Eminence.

    Property transfers

    Edwin L. Cohen, Louisville, to James E. Cohen, Turners Station and Nancy L. Noblitt, Turners Station. Property in Henry County; $189,600.

  • Accused arsonist dies

    General Manager

    The Eminence man charged with setting a fire that destroyed his father’s auto-parts store has died.

    Michael G. Wells, 46, was found dead in his home Dec. 13, less than a week after he was indicted on charges related to the Aug. 30  fire that destroyed the Eminence Auto Parts/NAPA store.

    Preliminary autopsy results were inconclusive, and Henry County Coroner Jimmy Pollard said foul play is not suspected. He said toxicology results would be available in six to eight weeks.

  • Chili parlor makes good use of garden veggies

    Staff writer/photographer

    “It may be cold outside, but it’s chili in here,” could be the advertising hook for Hollingsworth’s Chili House and Diner just west of Campbellsburg.

  • 10th anniversary of tobacco settlement passed with little fanfare

    10th anniversary of tobacco settlement passed with little fanfare

    It didn’t receive a lot of fanfare, but late last month marked the 10th anniversary of the $206 billion dollar settlement between the states and the major tobacco companies.

    As many of you may know, Kentucky chose an innovative path for its portion of the money.  In 2000, the General Assembly set aside half for agriculture and half for programs to help our youngest and sickest citizens.