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Today's News

  • Spring Fling planning is underway

    Plans are currently underway for the 27th Annual New Castle Spring Fling.  The date is Saturday, June 13.  The committee is currently working on several things for the 27th Annual New Castle Spring Fling, but the economic crisis has hit us hard and we are strapped for funds to run the festivals in New Castle. The festivals are the Spring Fling, Fall Fling, and Christmas in New Castle.  We need some donors to step up and sponsor our festivals.  If we don’t get more sponsorships, we might have to take drastic cuts in the festivals.   It would be v

  • A new chapter

    General Manager/Editor

    On Monday, March 2, the Henry County Local will formally open its doors for business at 18 South Penn Avenue in Eminence.

    As we close the door at 1837 Eminence Road, we thought we’d take a look back at the paper’s history.

    Many Henry County residents may remember the Henry County Local’s current building as a once popular hang out – the Dairy Castle.

  • Do we really need this much protection?

    On the prairies of eastern Kansas, the early spring is when ranchers do their annual burning to allow the new spring grass to emerge with full vigor. I used to love to watch the flickering horizon on the prairie from my front porch. But every once in awhile, the Kansas winds would pick up or shift direction so that those “controlled” fires became a potential menace.

     

  • Crawford kicks off Relay with laughter

    Staff writer/photographer

    Setting dinner on fire may not be the first metaphor to come to mind when discussing the home care of a cancer survivor, but according to Byron Crawford, it perfectly described his competence as a caregiver.

    Crawford, a long time Louisville Courier-Journal columnist, helped kick off the 2009 Henry County Relay for Life.

  • Thanks for donations

    I would like to thank Scriber Station and an awesome Sunday School group at Eminence Baptist Church for donating a meal for 20 of our seniors once a month and Eminence Christian Church for donating a meal once every 3 months. This means a lot to our Meals on Wheels program.

    I want to reiterate that these donations along with any monetary donations will keep this program running. We need your help to continue to provide meals for the seniors in this community.

  • Steel Tech: From small beginnings

    Staff writer/photographer

    In the beginning, there was just one steel slitter in an 8,000 square foot warehouse. There was no crane, only a forklift.

  • 2010 election moment has started in Henry County

    Thanks to the Henry County Local for reporting on a very important issue pertaining to our county politics in last week’s paper. As reported, it appears the momentum of the 2010 election has started and many Henry County residents and Kentucky state representatives have taken an interest in the future of Henry County and it’s political status.   Last meeting, Secretary of State, Trey Grayson provided information and direction at the last Henry County Republican monthly meeting.

  • The life and adventures of Henry Bibb

    Staff writer/photographer

    Henry Walton Bibb was born in, or near, New Castle in 1815. Bibb was the son of Kentucky State Senator, James Bibb. He grew up to be a respected writer, editor and newspaper publisher.

    It should have been a typical success story. Not so for Henry Bibb.

    He was the illegitimate mulatto son of a slave and a white man born in the early 19th century. He, of course, was not acknowledged as Bibb’s son and grew up a slave.

  • Survey questions are being addressed

    The first priority of elected officials at any level of government is making sure that they truly listen to those they serve.

    With that in mind, I sent out a 17-question survey before the start of the 2009 Regular Session to gauge the views of several hundred households located in our legislative district.  The results, as I expected, were enlightening.

  • Eminence pastor witnessed, lived black history

    Staff writer/photographer

    It was 1964 and the young Rev. Wilbert Goatley had been pastor of the First Baptist Church in Eminence six short years.

    Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., was scheduled to speak at a large civil rights rally at the state capitol in Frankfort and Goatley and other activists in the area prepared for the visit. “We carried eight carloads from this church,” he said. “We met in the churches and ended our rallies singing ‘We Shall Overcome.’”