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Today's News

  • What are our children learning?

    The question is not whether children and teenagers are learning from today’s media but rather what are they learning?

    According to the April 2006 issue of Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, TV, movies, video games, and Internet use have become a “major public health issue” among youth today and that “[this] intersects with many other issues that are critically important to child health, including violence, obesity, tobacco/alcohol use, and risky sexual behaviors.”

  • Students delight in poetry competition

    When Eminence High School English teacher, Cara Puckett, offered me the opportunity to be a guest judge for her students’ Poetry Out Loud competition, I eagerly accepted.

    I like poetry, I like teenagers, how hard could it be?

    Then I checked out the Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Project website and started to appreciate the complexities.

    Participants were to choose two poems from a list of thousands spanning hundreds of years and representing all the different types of poetry.

  • Relay For Life Kick off planned

    Henry County Relay For Life Kick Off is scheduled for Monday, Feb. 23. The event will be held at the 4-H building at the Henry County Fairgrounds at 7 p.m. This year’s featured speaker will be Byron Crawford.

  • Thanks to all who helped during ‘natural disaster’

    Our Governor is calling it the most widespread natural disaster in our state’s history.  This was my second widespread natural disaster since taking office.   In the case of the tornadoes of 2004 and this recent ice storm, I have been extremely proud of the caring and resourceful people of this county.  At this time I would like to thank a few of those who pitched in to make the best out of the recent event.

  • Restoring power can be long job

    Staff writer/photographer

    Thursday morning the sun dazzled on the snow and ice-covered ridge topping Barton Lane close to Pt. Pleasant Christian Church.

    The serenity of a devastatingly beautiful winter scene was only disturbed by animal tracks criss-crossing the ice and generators humming outside the scattered houses. An open charcoal grill outside a shed playfully labeled the Pitts was, possibly, that family’s only means of cooking supper since the power went out in the early morning hours of Jan. 28.

  • ACS network helps patients, survivors and caregivers

    For those in Kentucky who will be diagnosed with cancer this year, there will be many questions and emotions. A newly diagnosed patient may have questions about how to tell his or her family, what treatment options are available, or may need help understanding the complex medical system. There will be many practical considerations as well, such as what treatment will be like, how to handle financial concerns, or how to get to and from appointments.

  • Many helped in making roads safe, getting students home

    On Feb. 3, the snow caused considerable headaches for many motorists. The timing of the snow and more of it than was forecast caused many parents to have concerns about the safety of their children while traveling home from school. I, like every employee of the Henry County Public Schools, make the safety of our children my number one priority each and every day. It gives me great comfort to know that the transportation staff performs their duties with a great amount of professionalism.

  • OneCall used for 1st time

    Staff writer/photographer

    When Henry County was slammed with snow and ice on Jan. 27-28, the county had a new tool to notify residents of an emergency situation.

    Installed in December, the OneCall Inc., emergency notification system was used for the first time in Henry County.

  • Brief - trash pick up in Pleasureville

    Industrial Disposal was unable to run its regular trash routes last Friday, January 30 due to inclement weather. Pick up will resume on its regular schedule as of Friday, February 6.

  • I’m not the pioneer I thought I was

    The recent power outage made me realize that perhaps my self-image has always been slightly askew. All my life, I have fancied myself the “pioneer” type; delighting in the sight of my baby’s freshly washed diapers flapping in the Kansas breeze, making jam out of the wild blackberries I picked myself on our farm, knitting cotton dishrags for the kitchen, and helping haul water when we still depended on a cistern.  I have always felt the simple life was for me, as if I could step into the pages of a Laura Ingalls Wilder book and feel completely at home.