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Today's News

  • HC Medical Center awarded
  • A lifetime in Extension: Curtis Coombs

    By Will Phillips

    news@hclocal.com

    Curtis Coombs may not have 50 years of experience, but Extension has still played a pivotal role in his life. The 26-year-old Coombs first started with 4-H when he was 10, showing cattle.

    “I started Extension in 4-H…that kinda led me in to start showing cattle,” Coombs said. “I bought a show calf. Then from there, I went to camp every year. I went to 4-H Camp five or six years as a 4-H’er. Then I went one year as a team leader.”

  • Eminence Art Club paints in broad strokes

    By Will Phillips

    news@hclocal.com

    The art club at Eminence Independent School is learning what it takes to raise money. The club, directed by art teacher Robin McHone, is creating pieces of art to auction off on Thursday, May 8. The auction’s proceeds will help fund a field trip for the group.

  • Wildcats crush Western Warriors 17-0

    The Henry County Wildcats managed to get two games in last week despite the foul weather to start the week. On Thursday the Wildcats scored 10 runs in the first inning to put the game away against the Western High School Warriors en route to a 17-0 win. Friday night they played away at Simon Kenton where the tables were turned on the Wildcats as the Pioneers won 11-0 in five innings.

    HCHS 17 Western 0

  • Memoir: Our family and 4-H

    The Skidmore family was involved in the first 4-H Club in Henry County. Our father, L. C. Skidmore, Jr., was a member of the first club, started by C. C. Malone, the first County Agent of Henry County, in the mid-1920’s.

    I (Mary Lynn) spent many Sunday mornings with my dad in his latter years and he shared a lot of his memories with me. Many of those fond memories were of his experiences in 4-H and his love of the cattle business.

  • Getting green with Eminence Christian Church

    Eminence Christian Church’s Green Ministry is doing its part to increase awareness of environmental issues in Henry County. The program, now in its ninth year according to co-chairman Bill Brammell, came from a desire to follow what the church felt was its calling to ministry.

  • Fiscal passes frugal budget

    By Melissa Blankenship

    publisher@hclocal.com

    The difference between last year’s Fiscal Court budget and this year’s is a little over $311,000, but most line items are similar if not exactly the same as last year’s.

  • Help ‘Stamp Out Hunger’

    By Melissa Blankenship

    publisher@hclocal.com

    Since it began, the Post Office’s national Stamp Out Hunger campaign has collected over one billion pounds of food, amassing 74 million pounds last year alone. But locally, only about 10 pounds was collected last year and Eminence Postmaster John Donnelly wants to change that – in a big way.

    “We’re hoping to get 1,000 pounds of food this year,” Donnelly said. “And I really think we can do it.”

  • Juniors selected for college program

    Several local high school juniors have been chosen to participate in this year’s Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP).

  • Lawsuit against Eminence schools dismissed

    By Melissa Blankenship

    publisher@hclocal.com

    The lawsuit against Eminence Independent Schools Board of Education regarding their recent tax increase has been dismissed.

    Eminence resident Justin Atchison filed the lawsuit on the basis that EIS had passed the tax levy improperly following what he considered to be an inaccurate legal notice reflecting the previous tax rates, the compensating rate and the proposed rate and the funds realized from each.