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Today's News

  • School briefs for Feb. 15, 2017

    Smith graduates Summa Cum Laude

    Fleet Smith graduated from Kent State University Summa Cum Laude with a Bachelor of Science degree from the College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology, according to a news release. Smith is among nearly 3,000 students who received bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, associate and educational specialist degrees during Kent State’s 2016 Fall Commencement ceremony.

    Howard earns honors at Centre College

  • Eminence students tee off in golf club
  • Eminence First-graders tell who they melt for in book launch
  • New Castle Elementary School earns Energy Star certification

    New Castle Elementary School has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) Energy Star certification, which signifies that the building performs in the top 25 percent of similar facilities nationwide for energy efficiency and meets strict energy efficiency performance levels set by the EPA, according to a news release from the federal agency.

  • USDA’s latest numbers on Ky. cattle

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) recently released the cattle report, showing little change in beef cow numbers, but a continued decline in milk cows in Kentucky.
    “This report shows cattle production remains a vital part of the Commonwealth’s agricultural economy,” said David Knopf, director of the NASS Eastern Mountain Regional Office in Kentucky. “In 2015, gross receipts from cattle were $927 million, the second leading commodity behind broiler production.

  • Drink up: Get enough water to promote health and wellness

    Most of us hear early on that we should drink water for good health, but some of us may not know why it is so important.
    More than two-thirds of our bodies are made of water. It helps lubricate our joints, and without water our organs could not properly function.
    Water is also essential in helping us remove waste from our bodies.
    If you don’t consume enough water, you run the risk of becoming dehydrated.
    Dehydration can cause headaches, mood changes, fever, dizziness, rapid heartbeat and kidney problems among others.

  • Warm winter could affect tall fescue toxicosis

    This warm winter has been nice because of 50 degree weather and not having to feed as much hay.
    However, this warm winter has played havoc for many farmers, such as increased mud and lately I have heard from Dr. Ray Smith from the University of Kentucky that this mild winter is likely to cause higher than average concentration of ergovaline in tall fescue.
    Tall fescue is still widely planted throughout Kentucky because of its yield potential and ruggedness, but tall fescue is naturally infected with an endophytic fungus that produces ergovaline.

  • Unemployment rates drop all over the state, except for two counties

    Unemployment rates fell in 119 Kentucky counties between December 2015 and December 2016, but rose in Lyon County (6.3 percent in December 2015 to 6.6 percent in December 2016), according to a news release from the Kentucky Office of Employment and Training, an agency of the Kentucky Education and Workforce Development Cabinet.
    Only Magoffin and Leslie counties had double-digit rates for December 2016.  

  • Chamber to launch Leadership Henry County

    By Holly Kinderman

    Henry County Chamber of Commerce

  • Kentucky cattlemen’s association elects officers

    The Kentucky Cattlemen’s Association elected new officers at the recent convention, including, front row from left: Kentucky Cattlemen Association President Chuck Crutcher; President Elect Bobby Foree of New Castle; Vice President Tim White; Secretary/Treasurer Ken Adams; and Past President David Lemaster. Standing from left: Cary King, Kentucky Beef Network chairman; Chris Cooper, KCA program chair; and Steve Dunning, KBC program chair.