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Today's News

  • Mini football camp back in Pleasureville

    For the second year in a row, the Pleasureville Colts' football team - part of the Henry County Youth Football League - will hold a mini camp each Saturday in April.

    The camp, which is free to the public and open to first through sixth graders that plan on playing for the Colts this upcoming HCYFL season, will be held every Saturday at the Pleasureville Firehouse from 9 to 11 a.m.

    "It's a way to get kids out and interested in football," Eastern coach Jason Warner said. "I picked up seven kids from doing it last year so I turned it into an annual thing."

  • Youngsters showing signs of future success on the court

    By looking at the success this year's Henry County sixth-grade traveling basketball team produced, you can't help but get excited if you're a Henry County High School fan.

  • Semifinals and finals pushed back a day at HCHS

    Because of delays in the girls' 8th Region tournament, which pushed its championship game to this past Monday at Shelby County High School, the boys' 8th Region tournament semifinals and finals have been moved back a day at Henry County High School as well.

    Shelby played South Oldham Tuesday in the first semifinal while Gallatin County played North Oldham in the second. The winners of those two games will meet for the regional title, and a chance to move on to the Boys' Sweet 16 state tournament, Wednesday at 7 p.m.

  • March is Music in Education month

    As a humble third grader, I loved to sing. I cannot begin to express how much I loved it. The problem was, at least according to my sister, I was tone deaf.

    I had not yet acquired the Criss family gene, handed down through my mother, for musical aptitude.

    That would change when I entered the fourth grade and had my first experience with instruments.

    It was then, through school, that I learned to play the violin. Over the years, I was able to lose the tone-deafness, and now can sing my then favorite song - Toto's "Roseanna" without missing a beat ... or a note.

  • Superintendent thanks Foundation supporters

    On behalf of the Eminence Education Foundation and the Eminence Independent School District, I would like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude for making our Education Dinner and Silent Auction such a success. The Foundation collected over $10,000 to use for future scholarships and teachers' grants.

  • Skate park is 'catching air'

    By Brent Schanding

    Landmark News Service

    A group of skateboarders, blamed for vandalizing a New Castle bank, will band together to construct a skate park.

    They will form a committee to fundraise, plan, design and construct what could be an 8,000 square-foot-facility in New Castle or outlying areas. It could feature ramps, rails and half-pipes, they hope, and accomodate skateboarders, inline skaters and bikers of all skills.

  • Rebate checks could offer jump starts to some

    By Brent Schanding

    Landmark News Service

    Save it. Spend it. Use it to pay bills.

    Starting in May, U.S. taxpayers will receive rebates of several hundred dollars from the federal government under a plan to stimulate the economy. Pushed by President George W. Bush and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell R-Ky., the measure will 'rush' checks of $600 to individuals and $1,200 to couples who paid income tax under a joint filing. People who did not pay federal income taxes, but earned income of more than $3,000, will get checks of $300 per individual or $600 per couple.

  • Son charged in mothers death

    Landmark News Service

    A 55-year-old mentally handicapped man was arrested for murder Friday night after police say he bludgeoned his mother to death at their Eminence home.

    Maralyn "Lynn" Burchett, 78, was found dead by family members at her Shadyview Drive home sometime Friday afternoon.

    Burchett's son, Warren D. Stone, was charged with capital murder in her slaying after police stated he confessed to the crime.

    "There was an argument and he killed her," Eminence Police Chief Carey Duncan said.

  • Bridge Aftercare - life beyond prison

    By Jonna Spelbring Priester

    General Manager

    It's a number Vincent Ingabrand won't forget anytime soon - 165580.

    The number is the designation he earned during the first of his stints in the state penitentiary. Ingabrand has been a resident of eight county jails, two penitentiaries and five institutions in nine years.

    Just 23 days after leaving the penitentiary in 2006, he found himself back in jail because of a DUI.

    But now, Ingabrand is trying to walk the straight and narrow.

  • Senate bill would scratch CATS assessment

    By Brent Schanding

    Landmark News Service

    Educators and others testified at the Capitol Thursday about a bill to replace the state's student-testing system with nationally standardized tests.

    Senate Bill 1 would eliminate the Commonwealth Accountability Testing System, or CATS, including its multiple-choice testing in the areas of arts and humanities. Portfolio components meant to judge schools on student writing abilities would also be abolished under SB 1. Both measures were mandated under the sweeping Kentucky Education Reform Act of 1990.