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Columns and Editorials

  • Reckoning with Addiction: Insuring your health

    By John Inscore Essick

    Towards the end of each calendar year my wife and I sit down to assess our health insurance options for the upcoming year.
    As a cancer survivor with no employer-based health insurance option, the Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare, has made health insurance both possible and relatively affordable for my family. But simply having health insurance doesn’t solve everything.

  • Bevin explains the rationale behind his veto decisions

    By Gov. Matt Bevin

     

  • Berry: Dairy farmers need solutions for overproduction issues

    By Wendell Berry “The Farmer’s Pride” for March 15 features a heartbreaking story by Carilynn Coombs about the “termination” by Dean Foods of its “milk procurement contract” with her family – along with more than a hundred other dairy farmers in Kentucky.

  • Reckoning with Addiction: Pain and the way we hurt by John Inscore Essick

    Recently I spoke with Drs. Donna and Damon Gatewood about pain and how opioid abuse is changing the way they practice medicine.
    They are both family doctors who see patients of all ages (Donna in Crestwood and Damon in Campbellsburg) and regularly provide medication-assisted treatment of opioid addiction at a clinic in Louisville.
    The Gatewoods routinely see patients who are seeking relief from acute and/or chronic pain.
    Acute pain is the body’s signal that we need immediate medical attention for a broken bone or kidney stone. In time, acute pain will go away.

  • A hidden gem - appreciating the sense of community

    Somehow I’ve managed to bypass Port Royal during my four years here in Henry County, and only made it out there finally just because a suspect recently declined to stop for a police officer and I wanted to take a photo of the smashed personal vehicle that resulted from that intransigence.
    What an idyllic place — to have at least two businesses with just a handful of residents nearby is quite a feat in this day and time.
    From my windshield survey, I believe Port Royal probably serves as an exemplar of what small towns across the country used to be like.

  • Teachers have enough to do in school without packing

    In years past, I was “one of those people” who didn’t like guns. I still don’t, but after meeting my husband — he grew up as an Indiana farm boy — I understand why people have them.
    Ron and his father used a rifle to shoot at “varmints” that got into the family garden and the crops.
    The rifle also served as protection against home invaders because they lived in an isolated area.
    Ron’s extended family also hunt deer, something I found appalling until I learned how many families use deer as their only meat for the year.

  • It’s too quiet now as the downtown continues to change

    Ever since Chat ’N’ Nibble closed, it’s been way too quiet here on South Penn Avenue.
    Unfortunately, the Henry County Local remains the last business standing where folks come to work every day on our block.
    After I came to Eminence in 2014, having enough space to park out front was still enough of an issue where people would remark on it regularly — that there were too many customers and workers vying for the same limited amount of parking.

  • Reckoning with Addiction: Shorter lives and other effects

    By John Inscore Essick

    Port Royal Baptist Church

    The average lifespan for Americans has been going up since the 1960s.

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic caused a brief drop in life expectancy in 1993, but the average age began to rise again as we learned how to help those with HIV/AIDS live longer with the virus.

    Similarly, public health researchers suggest that the recent spike in opioid overdoses is also lowering life expectancy projections in the United States.

  • Looking for courageous leaders to set the right tone

    Rep. Rick Rand (D-Bedford) told a story last Saturday during the Henry County town hall meeting that stuck with me.
    Rand explained that when he was first elected to the Kentucky legislature, he asked a mentor how to know when he was doing the right thing for his district. The advisor answered, “You already know what’s right. You just need the courage to do it.”
    Courage is lacking in the Kentucky legislature, Rand believes.

  • Social media fears cause a virtual nervous breakdown

    Is there any word more apt to describe the recent eruption of parental concern on social media over talk of violence at Henry County High School than hysteria?
    It’s unfortunate that instances of school shootings happen so often and that they come to our attention to spur so much fear, but that’s where we are.
    These factors apparently contributed to a breakdown of trust of the decision-making abilities of the educators who are charged with taking care of the students during the day.