Columns and Editorials

  • Community lost a good man in Norm

    I only met Norman Wood once, nearly 40 years after he created and launched the pre-eminent local grocery store. But it only took that one encounter to understand the most important parts of his life.

    He loved his wife Sally — the Pleasureville girl that he first met at the lunch counter in Cincinnati. Her mother Peggy Jones, who also worked at the lunch counter, evidently suspected that Sally would like the up-and-coming A&P manager who had a good job and income with a large corporation.

  • Hope I live long enough to be called feisty

    I recently had a delightful visit with Mrs. Aline Stivers, a resident of Twin Oaks Assisted Living. Aline welcomed me into her apartment, which was neat as a pin by the way, and we talked for about an hour on a subject Mrs. Stivers found a little uncomfortable – herself!

    Aline will turn 100 years old this Friday, and with 365,000 days under her belt, she has lived a lifetime and then some. So settling on which details of her life to share with me might have proved daunting. 

  • Improvements in education

    Not long after the start of each school year, Kentucky begins getting report cards on the overall progress our students are making.  These annual updates give the public the chance to learn if we are still heading in the right direction academically.

  • News about the flu vaccine

    by Jennifer Grove, Bluegrass Pharmacy

    It’s really tough to stay on top of all the health news these days. Since the flu season is right around the corner, here’s a snapshot of recent news stories about the flu vaccine. 


    Flu shot helps people with diabetes 

  • County needs more Odd Fellows, not less

    You wouldn’t necessarily know it now without being a local history buff, but by the accounts I’ve seen and heard, the Eminence Lodge 140 of the International Order of the Odd Fellows used to be a real local powerhouse.

    I’ve written about the Eminence lodge a couple times recently as they’ve had the misfortune to be the victim of a theft of a big part of their financial assets, which prompted the closing of the long-established fraternal order.

  • Turning lies into truth

    “I’m not sure what to do,” my friend lamented to me.  “If I respond, I may just stir things up even more.  On the other hand, if I remain quiet, people are likely to think I have something to hide.”

    My friend is a public servant, working in one of those jobs that, no matter what he does, he creates detractors, if not out-right enemies. I asked him once why he did it.  He looked at me like I had just arrived from an alien world and then told me.  

  • More on the ballot than the presidential race

    In the current political climate, apathy is a common response. 

    Given the top two choices for the person who will be tasked with leading this country and the controversies surrounding each, many have declared they are simply opting out and will choose not to vote for either.

    Apathy is not the solution. And not voting is a cowardly way to equip yourself with the best excuse ever to denigrate the effectiveness of whomever is chosen.

  • 9/11 - One day with lots of meaning

    On Sunday morning, our nation will pause to remember and reflect upon the tragedy known primarily by its date: 9/11.

    Those of us old enough to remember that Tuesday in 2001 will never forget where we were and what we were doing when we heard the news.  It had the same impact as such other pivotal moments in history, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and President Kennedy’s assassination to Neil Armstrong’s walking on the moon.

  • Labor Day marks end of summer and so much more

    At their core, the major American holidays are bound by a common thread: They remind us of who we are and what we stand for, each and every year.

    While the Fourth of July celebrates our founding and freedom, Memorial Day and Veterans Day call on us never to forget the high price paid for those enduring gifts.  Thanksgiving gives us a moment among loved ones to appreciate the many good things in our lives, and on Labor Day, which arrives this weekend, we pay tribute to the hard work that made our nation what it is today.

  • Investing in a town's past better positions it for the future

    When 18 S. Main Street in New Castle was still up for grabs, I seriously considered buying the classic commercial core building.

    I stumbled upon the auctioneer one day, sat in the first floor commercial space, shooting the breeze with him about real estate. With his blessing, I glanced around the still-equipped business with all the fittings and fixtures set to go with the building, and then climbed the stairs to make a more careful study of the apartment on the second floor.