Columns and Editorials

  • Every day provides opportunities to be thankful

    Thanksgiving definitely provided the warming glow of visiting with family, while nestled in my in-laws’ new home. It was more than cozy.
    Beth and I switched up holiday travel this year with the destination of Asheboro, N.C., as our goal to carve turkey and ham with extended family.
    A fairly typical southern city, Asheboro built itself up through a cluster of furniture and textile mills, but now is mainly known to outsiders as the official home of the North Carolina Zoo.

  • Legislators are preparing for the 2016 General Assembly

    With Thanksgiving behind us and Christmas and New Year’s Eve fast approaching, the General Assembly is winding down what it calls the interim and is preparing for the 2016 legislative session, which will start on Jan. 5 and last for 60 working days.
    Although it is impossible to predict what ultimately will become law, we are getting a clearer idea of the major topics that will be debated.

  • Talking turkey trivia for Thanksgiving day

    This week, our family and friends will gather around the dinner table as they have for generations to celebrate a holiday that is nearing its 400th anniversary.

    As even some of our youngest students can tell us, what is widely considered to be America’s first Thanksgiving took place in 1621, when the Pilgrims and a tribe of Native Americans came together for a three-day feast to give thanks for a successful harvest.

  • Important to manage your diabetes medications

    By Jennifer Grove, Bluegrass Pharmacy

    It’s not the kind of club you really want to belong to. Today, nearly half of all American adults have type 2 diabetes or are at risk of getting it. 

  • Higher education paying off for Kentuckians

    In the late 1990s, the state rolled out a simple but effective campaign summarized by two words: “Education pays.”

    That popular slogan came on the heels of a landmark overhaul of our public postsecondary schools and the creation of such programs as KEES, the lottery-based college scholarships that high school students earn with good grades, and “Bucks for Brains,” which added hundreds of millions of state and private dollars to our university research budgets.

  • Shopping at small businesses can make big impact on local economy

    By Tom Underwood

    Every year, Gallup asks people how much confidence they have in various institutions.

    The results aren’t surprising. Only 8 percent had “a great deal” or “quite a lot” of confidence in Congress. Big business scored 21 percent. That’s no better than TV news.

  • Letting leaves lie where they may leads to lush lawns

    Here’s a riddle: What kind of culture throws yard waste in the trash while at the same time scattering many roadside spaces with so much garbage?

    Answer: One that doesn’t have many of its priorities straight.

  • Gubernatorial transition mired in tradition and law

    While last week’s gubernatorial election marked the end of this year’s campaign season, it also kicked off the beginning of a transition period that has been guided by tradition and the state constitution for much of our history.

    Not quite 60 people have served as governor since Kentucky joined the United States in 1792.  In the beginning, voters did not have a direct say; instead, the decision was made by a group of electors, similar to our presidential elections today.

  • More gun control not answer to school shootings

    I caught myself using the phrase, “back in my day,” more than once this past week.

    During a conversation with a 20-something, she mentioned she actually had nightmares and was terrified of the idea of a school shooting when she was in high school.

  • 'Flying jewels of the natural world'

    I appreciated a recent Henry County Local editorial that addressed the plight of monarch butterflies and their survival as a species.

    Over the last few decades their numbers declined considerably, due mainly to their host plant, milkweed, disappearing from the landscape. Without these plants, monarchs have no place to lay their eggs. The larvae must have milkweed to survive because they can eat nothing else.