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Columns and Editorials

  • Breaking through the glass ceiling

    There’s a quote that says, “Well-behaved women rarely make history.”

    If that is the case, I was witness to a very rare history-making event and I almost missed it.

    At the beginning of last week’s Henry County Public Schools Board of Education meeting, Miranda Clubb was named the chair of the board. It was an agenda item that could have easily been overlooked and it happened so quickly and quietly, I had little time to jump up and grab a quick picture to preserve the moment.

  • Kentucky lost a 'true statesman' in Ford

    Late last week, Kentucky lost one of its true statesmen with the passing of former U.S. Senator Wendell Ford.

    Since then, there have been numerous accolades about his many accomplishments in Washington, D.C. – from helping to write and pass the Family and Medical Leave Act to promoting Kentucky’s signature coal and tobacco industries – but it is worth noting that several actions taken during his time as governor continue to benefit Kentuckians today.

  • Mesker: a legacy cast in iron

    Unexpectedly, I felt a burst of Evansville, Ind., hometown pride while talking to New Castle Main Street Manager Jeff Thoke last week.

    It didn’t occur to me while seeking the history of the city’s Locker building — on which there’s still a lot of blanks to fill in, if anybody out there would like to help — several artifacts from 160 miles away would turn up.

  • Senate passes four bills in first week of session

    By Paul Hornback, State Senator

    “Creating Kentucky jobs and strengthening Kentucky families” — this is how our caucus defined the overall goals of the Senate this session, and I’m proud to report that four of our priority bills to accomplish those objectives passed the Senate in our first week and are now on the way to the House.

  • Stewardship of land and animals taken seriously

     

    Sometimes I say it just to see how people will react.

    “I raise hogs,” I say.

  • Post-Christmas question: Is this all there is?

     

    As I sit to write this, the sun, which has been absent too many days, is shining brightly and streaming in through my window.  Just outside the window a redbird perches on a fence, taking in the brilliance of the sun and reflecting it through his red feathers.  

  • Feeding feathered friends without much flap

     

    Despite the gray veil of winter having descended on my new Kentucky home, a congregation of robins alit on every tree branch and went on thoroughly patrolling my neighborhood.

  • Annual event never ceases to amaze

    By today’s standards, it’s not much of a show.
    There are no flashing lights, no loud, chest-thumping music and very few moving parts.
    By all accounts, the annual Living Nativity in Bethlehem should be a real snooze-fest.
    To the contrary, the manger scene held nightly in the little town of Bethlehem is amazingly captivating.

  • Apply persepective to Ebola virus scare

    With the Ebola virus, as with anything, how worried you should be requires perspective.
    With this week’s revelation about deadly airbags, it appears American citizens are at four times greater risk from having a fatal accident with their own vehicular safety device than dying from the outbreak of the virus that causes hemorrhagic fever.
    One wag with an Internet meme referenced the danger from the disease more humorously: Country Singer Taylor Swift has broken up with more boys than Americans that suffer from Ebola.

  • The long way can be the most rewarding

     Two summers ago my family and I turned my dad’s business trip from Michigan to Las Vegas into a ten-day vacation. My brother had to stay behind for work, so my parents and sister and I made the sixty-hour drive. Thirty hours one way is long enough to spend in the car with anyone, let alone your family, but we saved money by not flying, and rented a vehicle with decent gas mileage.