Columns and Editorials

  • Head Start programs vital for Kentucky

    Every child that starts school unready is at risk for a lifetime of costly challenges, costs shared by all Kentuckians.  Head Start, as the nation’s largest preschool program, has a vital role in reducing these risks for Kentucky’s most vulnerable children and families.

  • Finding ways to protect those who serve

    When it comes to keeping us safe, it can be easy to take for granted those who protect us – until tragedy re-reminds us that their job can carry a steep price.

  • Local charity commits to changing lives

    This past Saturday morning was gloomy at best. It truly would have been a perfect day to sleep in, but I reluctantly rolled out of bed earlier than I wanted, needing to get ready to head out and take some photos for the paper.  

  • More farm freedom needed

    In 2011, federal agents launched a sting operation on an Amish farmer.  Prof. Baylen J. Linnekin provides details of the raid:

     “Federal agents watched the home closely for a year, gathering evidence.  Then, in a pre-dawn raid, armed members from three agencies swooped in.

  • Taxes will be put to good use by library

    When it comes to setting tax rates, I can hear in my mind a litany of objections to any increase coming down the pike from my many years of reporting.

    The most common that arose within my hearing over the years goes something like this: “I don’t get any public services for the taxes I’m paying.”

    It seems to me that’s a gross exaggeration.

  • Kentucky offers variety of fall entertainment

    While the temperature outside may not feel like fall just yet, many of the traditional signs of the season are starting to arrive.

    One of the most telling is the sheer number of festivals that have already started to take place and will run through Halloween.  They are centered on items you might expect – tobacco, apples and bourbon – and a few more that may seem odd until their history is known.

  • Recognizing history-making women in Kentucky

    Last week, the United States celebrated the 95th anniversary of women’s right to vote, a milestone made possible by the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

    Kentucky was the 23rd state to ratify that amendment, but it did not clear its final legislative hurdle until Tennessee became the 36th in Aug. 1920.  Interestingly, that decision was a close one, occurring only when a young legislator voted in favor at the request of his mother.

  • Smoothing over the rough patches

    Unusual as it might be, I believe one item from a honey-do list may have cemented itself as my new favorite hobby. It can cover up many of the pockmarks and blemishes in life.

    My wife Beth pushed the agenda, setting in proverbial stone what she wanted me to tackle next, by bringing home a bucket of cement patching compound and a trowel.  

  • Taking care of veterans should be a priority

    One of the ongoing challenges our country faces is making sure our veterans receive the full benefits they have rightfully earned.

    Unfortunately, as we discovered during a legislative meeting earlier this month, there are still some who are either unaware of what is available or who have become mired in bureaucracy.  The good news is that, thanks to the Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs (KDVA), we are making great strides in closing these twin gaps.

  • I'm going to need a giant can of hairspray

    Donald Trump and I have something in common, and it’s not the size of our bank accounts.

    Much like Trump, I, too, will report for jury duty this week. However, I won’t arrive in a limo, I won’t be allowed to park in a no parking zone and there won’t be any paparazzi there to capture my entry into the courtroom.