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Columns and Editorials

  • Generation Rx? Teens and prescription drugs

  • Visiting Washington, D.C., soon?

    Are you planning a visit to Washington, D.C.? 
    Whether you are coming on a school trip, family vacation or business trip, my office can help you make arrangements for some of the more popular attractions and landmarks in our nation’s capital.  We are available to help you reserve tours of the U.S. Capitol Building, Pentagon and White House.  These tours are an excellent way to see the highlights of Washington at no charge to you. 

  • Rand: Kentucky has strong 
connection to the arts

    While Kentucky is widely recognized for such things as fried chicken, horses and bourbon, it could be argued that our connections to the arts are just as considerable.

    Legend has it, for example, that Kentucky was the first state to see a performance of a Beethoven symphony, which was conducted in Lexington in 1817.

    Several weeks ago, meanwhile, the world marked the 100th birthday of an American legend, William “Bill” Monroe, the founder of bluegrass music whose Ohio County home has become a shrine to many.

  • Residents on Kentucky 146 unhappy with road proposals

  • KSP report gives information on accidents

    While no one can accurately predict where a traffic accident might take place, information gathered by the Kentucky State Police gives us a pretty good idea of when the odds are certainly more in our favor.

    Based on its latest annual report, which was released last week, one of the safest places to be on the highway in 2010 was in a vehicle driven at dawn on a Sunday in March by a woman in her late 60s or early 70s who was making her way between Owensboro and Henderson on the Audubon Parkway.

  • The task of improving America’s infrastructure

    Last week, President Obama visited the greater Northern Kentucky area to rally support for his bill, the American Jobs Act.  The President claims his bill will get Americans back to work in part by funding critical infrastructure needs.

  • Obama’s jobs plan: More of the same

    While traveling the Fourth Congressional District during August, it was clear to me that the top priorities of Kentuckians are jobs and economic growth.  The need for these issues to be our top priority is reinforced by the latest jobs report that zero net jobs were created in America last month, and the unemployment rate remains unacceptably high at more than 9 percent.

    As lawmakers returned to Washington last week, President Obama addressed a special joint session of Congress to outline his plan to get the economy moving again and create jobs.

  • State investment in land has been worth it

    “Buy land,” Mark Twain once said.  “They’re not making any more of it.”

    That investment advice has been taken to heart by the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, which formally celebrated 35 years of service last week.

    Since it began, the commission has permanently set aside more than 25,000 irreplaceable acres for future generations.  Their 60 nature preserves range from the Blanton Forest near Virginia to Three Ponds along the Mississippi River.

  • 9/11/01 will forever be remembered

    There are only a handful of days in which a whole country collectively remembers what it was doing.  Some have been high points in our history, like V-E and V-J Day at the end of World War II and Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon.  And some have been moments we wish had never occurred, like Pearl Harbor, President Kennedy’s assassination, and the tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001.

    For those old enough to remember that last date, it seems hard to believe that 10 years have slipped by since that cool and clear morning.

  • Commit random acts of kindness

    On April 20, 1999, the staff of the Evansville Press was plugging away at that day’s edition. We were minutes away from sending the pages to the press when we got word: About a dozen students were dead, and many more injured, at a high school in Colorado.

    Page production stopped as we gathered around the news editor’s television to get a glimpse of the initial reports. The Associated Press had a story in short order, and we were able to get word of the Columbine High School tragedy in that afternoon’s edition.