.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns and Editorials

  • Patrick Henry Award winner chosen

    Submitted by Pat Wallace
    Henry County Chamber of Commerce

    One of the criteria for a person to receive the Patrick Henry Award, the most prestigious given in the county, is that the person has made a tremendous contribution to the betterment of the county and that the overall involvement of this person be without fanfare.

  • Something old is something new

    As you flip through the pages of your Local today, you might notice a few things that are, well, different.

    The first is immediately opposite of this page — Local Buzz.

    The Local staff decided a few months ago that our community calender, or bulletin board, could use a change.

    We wanted to add a few things and remove a couple things, and present them in a more eye catching way.

    Cindy DiFazio and Tawnja Morris came up with the name —Local Buzz, and the rest is history.

  • Local staff recognized by KPA

    Every year, come the third weekend in January, journalists across the state converge upon Louisville or Lexington for the annual Kentucky Press Association convention.

    The convention holds a variety of seminars, each introducing new ideas, but the highlight of the convention comes on Friday night — the awards banquet.

    It’s there that the hard work we do throughout the year is formally recognized.

    And this year, I’m pleased to tell you that your home-town paper earned second place general excellence in the mid-sized weekly division.

  • Promoting pride and progress in HC

    In 2010, the Henry County Chamber of Commerce, for the first time, issued awards to a variety of individuals and businesses in Henry County. The awards recognized those folks for their unique contributions to the county.

    Those awards return again in 2011.

    Outstanding Emergency Services Personnel —All emergency personnel, paid and volunteer, are eligible for this award, which recognizes the winner’s role in the county’s emergency services.

  • Shelden’s death is a wake-up call

    I’m sure that somewhere there’s a statistic for everything.

    And somewhere in those statistics likely rests the number of people who die in their homes each year because of extreme cold or extreme heat.

    When Henry County coroner Jimmy Pollard called me Monday morning to tell me of the death of Myra Shelden, it weighed heavy on my heart.

    Shelden was found in her home on Friday night, with preliminary results indicating she died from hypothermia.

  • Agriculture remains a bright spot

    Although the economy has weathered some of its toughest years since the Great Depression, there has been one bright spot for Kentucky: Agriculture.  The new year, in fact, may just bring a new record with it.

    If all goes well, farm receipts could top $5 billion in 2011, or $1 billion more than just several years ago.

  • Looking back

    With the General Assembly set to start its legislative session early next week, now is the ideal time to take a look back at what has happened since the last one ended.

  • Falling through the charitable system

    Many Christmases ago, hard times hit the DiFazio clan. The kids were just in elementary school.

    Dad was finding it increasingly hard to deal with the debilitating effects of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Add to that the failure of both local businesses where he and I had worked for years.

    This perfect storm combined to leave us penniless at “the most wonderful time of the year.”
    I had been a part of charity in action most of my life, on the giving side.

  • There’s nothing like a book in hand

    The story on NPR Tuesday morning left me shaking my head.

    At the heart of the story was the question of whether or not print, specifically in this case the printed book, is dead, and how that will impact book stores large and small, chain or independent.

    Call me a luddite if you wish, but I refuse to believe that the physical book will ever really die.

    Raised in a household of readers, I grew up surrounded by books. A home is not a home for me until the bookshelves are up and laden with books.

  • Making Christmas special in Henry County

    Nestled in southeast Henry County in the village of Bethlehem is a treasure – the little Bethlehem post office. And yes, I am prejudiced, but perhaps less because I happen to live in Bethlehem than because of the hustle and bustle that I have experienced in big-city post offices, such as New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Baltimore and, most recently, Louisville.