.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns and Editorials

  • An introduction is in order. Meet Kristen...

    By Kristen Lowry

    I’m not from around here.

    In fact, before I moved here, the entirety of what I knew about Henry County came from Wendell Berry novels. Before I had ever heard of Port Royal, I had spent many hours with my nose in a book, exploring Port William.

    Then, in 2015, true love, via eHarmony, brought me to New Castle to marry the pastor of the Baptist church.

  • We make going viral our constant goal

     Last Friday served as a fairly routine day around the “Henry County Local” office as I typed up notes, answered phone calls and sent e-mails, despite the fact the newspaper could celebrate another unsurpassed online achievement.

  • Help others find their way to Recovery

    By Denise Perry 

    Henry County Deputy Judge-Executive

    As communities confront the addiction crisis running through them, everyone realizes that multiple and varied approaches are necessary. 

    Pastors and concerned citizens have been meeting for over a year.  One of the results of their efforts was Celebrate Recovery, which is now supporting individuals dealing with the struggles of rescuing themselves or someone they love.

  • Time well spent in my years at the Local

    When I first joined the staff of the “Henry County Local” back in 1999, I had never written a single newspaper article or managed a staff. I did come with a master’s degree in English and a good head on my shoulders, and the person who hired me must have seen some potential there.

    I came knowing next to nothing about running a newspaper.

  • Efforts to combat substance abuse

    Someone abuses drugs every hour in Kentucky. But just how people are addicted to drugs in Kentucky is hard to quantify. 

    The reason for that is not every addict seeks treatment and many die as a result. A record number of 1,248 people died from overdoses in 2015 alone, according to the state. 

  • Town has power to decide park's future

    Not long ago, the Eminence City Council made a commitment to citizens to provide a recreational amenity and to enhance Coach D Park, and now they’re making an appeal that everyone help protect this public investment.

    The sprayground cost about $110,000 to install. About half of that came from the state, and Eminence city officials put aside about $60,000 for the required match for the state funds.

  • New legislation protects gun rights

    The Second Amendment is in the news a lot these days. It should be. It’s an important part of our nation’s history. 

  • You can get a lot for just 75 cents!

    Wednesday afternoons at the Local office are usually quiet; that is unless we’ve had some delivery issues.

    Occasionally, subscribers call in very frustrated and upset because they did not receive their newspaper. For many, it’s part of their routine and when the paper doesn’t reach them – either in their mailbox or at their favorite retail outlet – their routine is completely compromised.

  • Who pays for conservation?

    As co-chair of the Kentucky Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus, I find it fitting to take a moment to extend an enormous debt of gratitude to our hunters and anglers. The critical contributions that these sportsmen and women make to our economy and professional fish and wildlife management in the Bluegrass State ensure that we will enjoy access to our hunting and angling traditions now and into the future.

  • Cup of Joe from Kentucky's former state tree?

    If the Leadership Henry County Class of 2017 is successful with its beautification planting and education project at the recreational and services park — and I have no reason to think it won’t be — one of the few plants named after Kentucky will soon grow there.

    Because of the project and because of where we are, I wanted to take a closer look at the Kentucky coffeetree species, and I discovered it’s a pretty quirky life form.