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Columns and Editorials

  • Agriculture remains a bright spot

    Although the economy has weathered some of its toughest years since the Great Depression, there has been one bright spot for Kentucky: Agriculture.  The new year, in fact, may just bring a new record with it.

    If all goes well, farm receipts could top $5 billion in 2011, or $1 billion more than just several years ago.

  • Looking back

    With the General Assembly set to start its legislative session early next week, now is the ideal time to take a look back at what has happened since the last one ended.

  • Falling through the charitable system

    Many Christmases ago, hard times hit the DiFazio clan. The kids were just in elementary school.

    Dad was finding it increasingly hard to deal with the debilitating effects of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Add to that the failure of both local businesses where he and I had worked for years.

    This perfect storm combined to leave us penniless at “the most wonderful time of the year.”
    I had been a part of charity in action most of my life, on the giving side.

  • There’s nothing like a book in hand

    The story on NPR Tuesday morning left me shaking my head.

    At the heart of the story was the question of whether or not print, specifically in this case the printed book, is dead, and how that will impact book stores large and small, chain or independent.

    Call me a luddite if you wish, but I refuse to believe that the physical book will ever really die.

    Raised in a household of readers, I grew up surrounded by books. A home is not a home for me until the bookshelves are up and laden with books.

  • Making Christmas special in Henry County

    Nestled in southeast Henry County in the village of Bethlehem is a treasure – the little Bethlehem post office. And yes, I am prejudiced, but perhaps less because I happen to live in Bethlehem than because of the hustle and bustle that I have experienced in big-city post offices, such as New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Baltimore and, most recently, Louisville.

  • Basketball has arrived

    When the Eminence High School football players were dropping like flies with all the late-season injuries, Eminence basketball coach Chris Nethery was clenching his teeth.

    Secretly, I was too.

    More than half of the football players finished the year injured, and with most of those players playing both sports, Nethery is left trying to put the pieces back together.

    It’s typical at a school the size of Eminence, but is worse this year. Nethery described the scene as the most injuries he has had to start a basketball season.

  • Coming soon: New look for hclocal.com

    If you visited our Website over the weekend, you may have noticed something different.

    It was a brief, unintentional unveiling of our new platform. As the platform wasn’t supposed to debut until Dec. 4, the old website was put back up almost as soon as we noticed the faux pas.

    There’s no denying that our soon-to-be old website left quite a bit to be desired. In fact, we were more than a little embarrassed by it. It was not the professional product we wanted to deliver to you.

  • I’m thankful for many things today

    It never fails. As we head into Thanksgiving week, my thoughts turn into what I’m thankful for — I imagine many of us experience that.
    Throughout the year, I think of these things, but often don’t write them down.

  • Government taking steps to be more open and responsive

    When we think of state and local governments, it is certainly understandable that much of our focus is on elected offices.  They are the ones, after all, that ultimately decide the direction the Commonwealth takes.

    But that should not underscore the critical importance of literally hundreds of quasi-government boards and agencies that range from the large – like the Kentucky Lottery Corporation – to such smaller ones as water, fire and library districts.  They, too, touch our daily lives, often in ways we may not even realize.