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Columns and Editorials

  • Kentucky moving closer to federal ID cards

    The 2017 session is coming down to the wire, with major legislation still left to consider on two “concurrence” days next week. After March 15, we recess until March 29 and 30, when we reconvene for our final two days to review any gubernatorial vetoes.

  • Get involved: choose not to be a silent bystander

    The most recent election and ensuing political climate has, at times and arguably, led to negative after-effects for our nation, our citizenry and even our personal relationships. However, I would like to point out one positive result of the eventful political season – community involvement.

  • Finding Gospel in the Charlie Daniels Band

    The best way to learn is to teach or mentor another person. 

    Through the years of my ministry, I’ve mentored a number of seminary students who were serving churches in our county. One of those was Bert Montgomery who served the Campbellsburg Baptist Church while attending Baptist Seminary of Kentucky. (By the way, Baptist Seminary of Kentucky is located on the campus of Georgetown College.)

  • Disappointed in bills passed

    Through a series of extreme parliamentary maneuvers that kept teachers and other interested Kentuckians from effectively voicing their concerns, the House Majority forced a vote on the “charter schools” bill Friday in an early morning committee meeting, before rushing the measure to the House floor where it passed on a 56-39 vote. 

  • Several bills leave Senate for House consideration

    Late nights, packed committee meetings, and heated debate marked the fifth week of the 2017 Session. The Senate is quickly passing the remaining Senate bills out and receiving bills from the House for consideration. While there were some contested issues, the Senate conducted itself in a bipartisan fashion. We wasted no time this week and passed over 40 pieces of legislation including:

    •Senate Bill 9, redistricting of judicial districts in order to better align caseloads with current census data;

  • Church histories, futures source of inspiration

    Always one to share ideas freely, more than a year ago Ron Wright, Eminence native and Washington Lodge Odd Fellows member, suggested I could always write articles on local churches for Black History Month.

    As a good idea, that one stayed with me all the way through the rest of 2016 and into 2017, and it turned out successfully — in my opinion, anyway — when it comes to telling stories from different perspectives.

  • Busy week at the Capitol

    Headlines in recent days have made it clear that Kentucky’s problems with heroin, other illegal opioids and prescription drug abuse, continue to take lives and devastate communities at a shocking rate.

  • Musical memories compose happiest times

    I’m sure my former teachers would find it disappointing that I can’t readily recall fifth grade geography (we had to label all the counties in Kentucky), eighth grade Earth science (is that limestone or sandstone?) or tenth grade geometry (tangent and co-tangent – no clue). However, I find it remarkable that I can remember the lyrics to a song I last heard 20 years ago when it comes on the radio.

  • Legislators begin work on 'ambitious' agenda

    I joined my fellow lawmakers back in Frankfort this week as we reconvened the 2017 session of the Kentucky General Assembly after a near month-long break following our brief, but rushed, organizational session in early January. 

  • Damaged buildings signal potential decline

    After an act of senseless, drunken vandalism caused damage to two businesses in Pleasureville some months ago, it could serve as a test of the broken windows theory in the city that straddles the Henry/Shelby county line.

    The broken windows theory predicts that small but persistent problems left unchecked will cascade into more serious breakdowns in social order, that crime arises from the resulting disorder.