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Columns and Editorials

  • Give teachers credit for students’ gain

    As we put another school year behind us – and as parents wait for the inevitable cries of “I’m bored” in the not-too-distant future – now is a good time to take a closer look at all of the good things going on academically.

    Over the long term, perhaps the best news came out of a 2012 Harvard study, which showed Kentucky tying for fifth among the states when measuring the gains our students have made over the last 20 years in math, reading and science.

  • A personal journey of recovery and kindnesss

    By Candy Clarke

     

    It all began quite innocently. My husband and I were in the process of establishing a primary health care provider here in Kentucky. After last year’s flu season, we had decided it would be in our best interest to have a local doctor. Many inquiries later, we had selected a physician; provided copies of medical records and made an appointment for the first visit.

  • Remember our veterans’ commitment to duty

    For nearly 150 years now, our nation has set aside a day to remember those who paid the ultimate price to protect our freedom.

    It is perhaps fitting that Memorial Day, which traces its roots to the Civil War, was itself the source of conflict for so many years.  It is believed to have begun in the South, when Confederate widows decorated not only the graves of their loved ones but also those of Union soldiers, knowing their families were grieving as well.

  • Swimmer’s ear a common, but treatable, problem

    Memorial Day is right around the corner.  This means it is time for one of my favorite activities - Swimming!  Kids and adults alike will soon be soaking up some sun as they splash in pools, lakes, and sprinklers.  It’s all fun and games until the next day when someone wakes up complaining of a terrible earache.  Swimmer’s ear is definitely a dreaded pain of summer.

  • General Assembly has come a long way with innovation

    By Rick Rand

     

    Kentucky has gotten a lot of attention over the years when it comes to finding innovative ways to govern.  Our education reforms of the 1990s were hailed as national models, for example, and we are the only state to permanently dedicate half of our annual tobacco settlement payments to agriculture, a move that has played a key role in the industry’s record sales in recent years.

  • The sign and signs

    On a recent Monday morning, one of Donna’s friends stopped by the house to pick her up.  They were headed to Paducah for the annual quilt show held in that city.  I helped Donna load her luggage into her friend’s car and waved them off.

  • There’s something in the air lately

    Economic development seems to be in the air of late.

    By way of a letter to the editor in our local paper a few issues back, a concerned resident from Pleasureville asked that the folks around town get together to discuss ways to revitalize the city. Apparently, they did exactly that at their last city meeting, and I say good for them.

  • Scientific studies prove nature has healing power for your health

    By Candy Clarke

    Spring is here; the flowers are blooming, the wonderful world of nature is constantly changing, and the fish may be biting. The sun is shining, a gentle breeze is blowing and the water is warm. That’s reason enough for me to hook up my little boat, loaded with fishing poles and  a picnic lunch, and head for the nearest body of water. It has the makings of a perfect day. What more could you want?

  • The doubter’s gift

    Most of us start out believing whatever we believe about whatever because someone we trust told us it was the truth.  For a while, it is enough.

    “The stove is hot.  Don’t touch!” Momma warned.  For a few people, the warning is enough.  For others, there will always be the necessity of testing the warning. 

  • Curiosity for bugs leads to discovery

    By Candy Clarke

    They’re adorable. We all comment on how pretty they are, but then we promptly forget about them; moving on to life’s next activity. That was me for many years. I never truly stopped to think about the importance of the well-known ladybug. Sure, I knew, like most of us, that the cute little things help protect crops. That was about the extent of it for me. Well, this week, they made their presence known once again. With their sudden appearance, I decided it was time to end my curiosity.