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Columns and Editorials

  • Gubernatorial transition mired in tradition and law

    While last week’s gubernatorial election marked the end of this year’s campaign season, it also kicked off the beginning of a transition period that has been guided by tradition and the state constitution for much of our history.

    Not quite 60 people have served as governor since Kentucky joined the United States in 1792.  In the beginning, voters did not have a direct say; instead, the decision was made by a group of electors, similar to our presidential elections today.

  • Letting leaves lie where they may leads to lush lawns

    Here’s a riddle: What kind of culture throws yard waste in the trash while at the same time scattering many roadside spaces with so much garbage?

    Answer: One that doesn’t have many of its priorities straight.

  • 'Flying jewels of the natural world'

    I appreciated a recent Henry County Local editorial that addressed the plight of monarch butterflies and their survival as a species.

    Over the last few decades their numbers declined considerably, due mainly to their host plant, milkweed, disappearing from the landscape. Without these plants, monarchs have no place to lay their eggs. The larvae must have milkweed to survive because they can eat nothing else. 

  • More gun control not answer to school shootings

    I caught myself using the phrase, “back in my day,” more than once this past week.

    During a conversation with a 20-something, she mentioned she actually had nightmares and was terrified of the idea of a school shooting when she was in high school.

  • A plan to defeat the zombie hordes

    Editor’s note: This column contains gory themes meant for mature readers during this Halloween season.

    Fans probably won’t appreciate this thought, but Rick Grimes, Glenn and Maggie, Carol and Daryl and the rest of the telegenic zombie apocalypse survivors are idiots.

  • Head Start programs vital for Kentucky

    Every child that starts school unready is at risk for a lifetime of costly challenges, costs shared by all Kentuckians.  Head Start, as the nation’s largest preschool program, has a vital role in reducing these risks for Kentucky’s most vulnerable children and families.

  • Welcome interruptions for editor and county

    In life, people fall into certain rhythms and patterns that, repeated enough, will eventually become routine.

    Possibly the most generic one is getting out of bed, preparing for the day, commuting to work, maybe spending as much as 7.5 hours being productive and taking a half hour for lunch, heading home after, having some dinner, visiting with loved ones and bed.

  • Finding ways to protect those who serve

    When it comes to keeping us safe, it can be easy to take for granted those who protect us – until tragedy re-reminds us that their job can carry a steep price.

  • Local charity commits to changing lives

    This past Saturday morning was gloomy at best. It truly would have been a perfect day to sleep in, but I reluctantly rolled out of bed earlier than I wanted, needing to get ready to head out and take some photos for the paper.  

  • More farm freedom needed

    In 2011, federal agents launched a sting operation on an Amish farmer.  Prof. Baylen J. Linnekin provides details of the raid:

     “Federal agents watched the home closely for a year, gathering evidence.  Then, in a pre-dawn raid, armed members from three agencies swooped in.