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Columns and Editorials

  • October in Alaska is a wild ride

    By Candy Clark

    October is a month of contradictions for Alaskans. We begin the month with the beautiful autumnal colors of fall and end the month shoveling snow. Whether raking leaves or shoveling snow; life, for Alaskans in Interior Alaska changes drastically during October.

    Our days get shorter; many of us leave for work in darkness and return home in darkness. Exterior home improvement projects must be completed before the wood or glass freeze solid for six months. Any outside painting  needs to be finished for the same reason.

  • It all belongs to God... and us, too

    The Psalmist declared, “The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it, the world, and all who live in it.” Psalm 24:1 NRSV

    Really? Well, of course the Lord created heaven and earth and all living things. I know that. Is that what the Psalmist meant? Maybe, but maybe more is meant.

  • A full report after my first Harvest Showcase

    Disclaimer: please read the following with tongue firmly planted in cheek.
    After attending my first Harvest Showcase, I must say I am disappointed.
    I didn’t have the opportunity to spend $20 dollars attempting to win an anemic gold fish in a plastic bowl. No chance to bust a few balloons for a Black Sabbath mirror or purchase a $5 plastic souvenir lemonade bottle which could’ve added to the shelves of useless cabinet clutter.

  • Wildlife has right-of-way on the Alcan

    By Candy Clarke

    Traveling the historic Alcan Highway is always an adventure in itself.

    The highway, built as a joint effort between Canada and the United States during World War II, still serves as the main highway to Alaska. You never know who or what you will encounter around the next curve or at the top of the next hill! It could be incredible scenery, messy road construction, an animal, or interesting travelers.

  • Awed: God takes notice

    A young boy stood in the center of the driveway of his family’s home. Beside him was a small telescope, mounted on a tripod. It was early in the afternoon on a hot summer day. The boy had attached a round, white screen to the eyepiece of the telescope.

    According to the boy’s science teacher, a total eclipse was to happen on that particular day. The telescope with its white screened eyepiece was aimed directly at the sun.

  • 1887: 43.5 acres purchased for $400

    200 Years Ago

    On July 27, 1812, two citizens were before the county court on the charge of breach of peace.  Both were found guilty and fined for their actions (no explanation given).  Peter Troutman was fined $4.17 and William O’Nan was fined $8.

    On July 24, 1812, Isaac Green posted a marriage bond for 50 pounds in order to secure a license to marry Nancy Roberts, daughter of James Roberts.  The bond was co-signed by James Roberts.  The wedding ceremony was performed on July 30, 1812, by the Rev. Isaac Malin.

    175 Years Ago

  • Eminence Guest column: July an unusually busy month for legislature

    July may not be a time normally associated with a rush of legislative activity, but in a key way, no month is busier.

    That’s because it marks the beginning of the state’s fiscal year, and it also is when most of the new laws adopted earlier in the year by the General Assembly take effect.  Unless there is an emergency clause or another specified date, all enacted bills officially go on the books 90 days after the end of a legislative session.  This year, that falls on July 12.

  • Root beer stand brings relaxation

    Driving across country from Kentucky to Alaska is never boring for me. Though I may see many of the same things several times, I am never bored. My husband, Frank, on the other hand, frequently has a “let’s just get there and then we can enjoy” mentality about travel. This attitude, I have noticed is particularly true prior to his arrival at his favorite root beer stand in Fort McLeod in Alberta, Canada.

  • When it come to children and cars, BE SAFE

    In light of the recent tragic and accidental death of 8-month old Lincoln Lindsay in Louisville, we are once again reminded of the danger of the heat in combination with distracted parents.  Lincoln was accidentally left in a car after his dad forgot to drop him off at daycare.  The infant died as a result of heat exposure while he was trapped in the car. 

    You may ask, “How could a parent forget a child in the car?” 

  • Sound advice: to thine own self be true

    We are often told that, if our lives are to matter, we must be selfless, always putting others first.  It’s good advice, but being selfless in a healthy manner is possible only when a person knows him/herself.

    Be selfish.  Take some time to think about yourself; figure out who you are.  Only then can you be a person capable of putting others first.

    In William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Polonius gave his son Laertes good advice:

    This above all: to thine own self be true,